Habeas Data – Datos Personales – Privacidad

Lanzamiento de DataProtection Review en inglés

Posted: noviembre 28th, 2006 | Author: | Filed under: General, Google, Revista | No Comments »

Se acaba de presentar “DataProtection Review”:http://www.dataprotectionreview.eu, esophagitis la revista de la agencia madrileña de protección de datos en idioma inglés, more about que complementa la ya conocida revista “datospoersonales.org”:http://www.madrid.org/comun/datospersonales/0,,457237_0_458301__-1,00.html . No es la primera publicación en inglés, pues ya existen prestigiosas revistas tales como “Privacy Laws & Business”:http://www.privacylaws.com/newsletters.international.html (editada por Stewart Dresner), “Privacy & Data Protection journal”:http://privacydataprotection.co.uk/journal/ (Editada por Peter Carey), y el “Privacy Law & Policy Reporter”:http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/journals/PLPR/ (PLPR) de Australia, de Graham Greenleaf, y por último, la “Revista de Habeas Data y Protección de Datos”:http://www.habeasdata.org/Revista-2006-1 que publicamos en este sitio y su “blog”:http://www.rdynt.com.ar/blog/.

Felicitaciones por el excelente logro. Abajo encontrarán el comunicado en inglés de la APD de Madrid.

***

The Data Protection Agency of Madrid (APDCM) is an independent public body that was set up in 1997 to supervise compliance with data protection regulations by the Local and Regional Public Administrations of the Region of Madrid. It was the first established sub-national data protection authority in Spain out of the three that now exist.

Since its very foundation, raising awareness among citizens and controllers as well as delivering training and education for public employees have been top priorities for the APDCM. In this respect, a number of initiatives and projects have been developed over the past years on an ongoing basis. Among them, it could mentioned that more than 30.000 public employees have attended training sessions on data protection organised by the APDCM, the organisation of seminars addressed to specific sectors (typically, around 5 seminars a year), the publication of manuals, sector guides and academic monographs on specific data protection topics, the leadership of European financed projects on training in data protection and data protection in e-Government (DATAPROT and e-PRODAT) and the annual convening of the European Price for Data Protection Best Practices in Public Bodies, now in its III Edition.

Besides, the APDCM has already a consolidated bi-monthly on-line magazine addressed to the Spanish speaking community. It has more than 5.800 subscribers and has already published 23 issues. Its main goal it is to serve as a knowledge management tool that can provide to the reader with the most outstanding news in the field of data protection, articles presenting the opinion of relevant experts, regulations, case law, decision and advice by the Data Protection Agency of Madrid, events, book reviews and discussion forums

As a new step in the direction of expanding knowledge about data protection and establishing a new vehicle for the exchange of information and experiences in the matter, the APDCM launches a new on-line review, the dataprotectionreview.eu that it is intended to appear every 4 months.

The review it is addressed to a broad international audience including members of data protection authorities, scholars, students, professionals, practicing lawyers, NGOs and to those members of the general public interested in having updated information on privacy matters as well as in reading opinions from Privacy and Data Protection Commissioners and relevant experts.

One of its main goals is to serve as a channel of communication for a broader audience to know all interesting national experiences, regulations, case law and news that many times, due to the language barrier, are not properly known outside a specific country.

The main sections you could find in every issue of the review are:

Commissioner-™s Corner: The magazine would include, in every issue, an article from a Data Protection Commissioner in which he or she could express his or her opinion on a subject of his or her choice because of its importance or topicality at the national or international level. It may serve as a good platform for Commissioners to speak up their opinions without the restrictions of formal meetings or the decisions or pieces of advice produced by Data Protection and Privacy Authorities have because of their nature.

Experts-™ Opinion: Articles from international data protection experts. They can be members of Data Protection Authorities, legal experts, university professors or practising lawyers. The papers can deal with different topics and from different angles depending of the author and may range from legal analysis of regulations or decisions from Data Protection Authorities to personal views on different subjects.

In the last four months: As a review that issues three numbers a year it cannot be expected to be updated with highly topical subjects but it would like to provide the readers with a summary of the most relevant and important facts and news that happened since the publication of the last issue.

Regulation and Case Law: Its contents will be references, reviews and comments of new regulations and important judicial decisions at any level: sub-national, national, European or worldwide.

Decisions and Opinions: It will be devoted to make available decisions and opinions of Data Protection Authorities of any country that are considered of interest because of its novelty, relevance or implications for citizens, institutions or data controllers.

The APDCM desires this new project be a useful tool for increasing mutual knowledge among the members of the international privacy and data protection community as well as a valuable source of information for any person interested in the subject. The members both of the Advisory Council and the Editorial Board, composed by Data Protection and Privacy Commissioners, University Professors and high-rank officials from Argentina, Belgium, Canada, Cyprus, Czech Republic, El Salvador, European Institutions, Germany, Greece, Italy, Lithuania, Mexico, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom and Uruguay will be happy to receive any information or contribution you may deem interesting for its publication.

The dataprotectionreview.eu is a free publication that can be accessed at “http://www.dataprotectionreview.eu”:http://www.dataprotectionreview.eu. If you would like to be informed of the publication of every new issue, you can freely subscribe by filling in the form you can find in this brochure and sending it to the indicated address or, alternatively, accessing the -Subscription- area of the online review.


Entrevista a Chris Hoofnagle

Posted: julio 5th, 2006 | Author: | Filed under: Entrevista, General, Público en general | No Comments »

*Entrevista a Chris Hoofnagle – Julio 2006* (“English”:http://www.habeasdata.org/Interview_with_Chris_Hoofnagle)

El Foro de Habeas Data presenta la primera de una serie de entrevistas a personas relacionadas con el mundo de la privacidad, cialis 40mg la protección de los datos personales y las nuevas tecnologí­as. La idea detrás de estas entrevistas es fomentar el dialogo en la materia, hacer conocer experiencias transnacionales y quienes son sus principales actores.

Pablo Palazzi


“Chris Hoofnagle”:http://choof.org/ es un experto en derecho a la privacidad y abogado admitido en California y Washington DC. Fue miembro no residente del Centro para la Sociedad e Internet de la Universidad de Stanford (“Center for Internet and Society”:http://cyberlaw.stanford.edu/) y un consultor en temas de privacidad. Hasta hace poco trabajó en Electronic Privacy Information Center donde estuvo a cargo de la organización de su oficina en la costa oeste (“EPIC West Coast Office”:http://west.epic.org/). Ha testificado ante el Congreso, en la Legislatura de California, y ante el Judicial Conference de los Estados Unidos sobre diversas cuestiones de privacidad. Es autor de numerosos “artí­culos”:http://ssrn.com/author=364326 y notas sobre privacidad, todos disponibles online en SSRN. Actualmente es staff attorney del “Samuelson Law, Technology & Public Policy Clinic”:http://www.law.berkeley.edu/clinics/samuelson/.

*HabeasData: Podrí­a comentarnos sobre su interés en privacidad. * ¿Cómo comenzó a estar interesado en estas cuestiones?*

*CJH:* Allá por la década del noventa, la industria del marketing directo era considerada una seria amenaza a la privacidad en parte por el gran cúmulo de datos personales que podí­an recolectar y eventualmente vender a las fuerzas de seguridad. Los representantes de la industria a través de la Asociación de Marketing Directo (“Direct Marketing Association”:http://www.the-dma.org/) acordaron una regla ética por la cual se prohibí­a la cesión de datos de marketing al gobierno y en forma enfática se acordó que esos datos no serí­an revendidos a las fuerzas de seguridad. Estos argumentos impulsados por las ideas del -libre mercado-, protegieron a la industria del marketing directo de una nueva regulación federal y permitieron que surgiera un amplio comercio de datos personales. Los defensores de la privacidad siempre estuvimos escépticos de este comercio de datos, y todaví­a lo creo así­. Siempre pensé que es naive o inocente sostener que las grandes empresas plantean riesgos a la privacidad distintos a los riesgos que plantea el Estado. Esta falta de control de la empresas de marketing en los años noventa llevó directamente a la situación actual, donde, a pesar de las promesas, casi todas las empresas de marketing o de datos personales están vendiendo sus datos al estado. Por eso he concentrado mi trabajo e investigación en la recolección comercial de datos personales y su relación con el gobierno y las fuerzas de seguridad. Esta relación, es obvio decirlo, se ha expandido en estos últimos años.

*HabeasData: El estado de la privacidad a partir de 9/11: podrí­a resumir para una audiencia latinoamericana * ¿qué clase de programas o acciones ha adoptado el gobierno norteamericano que puedan afectar la privacidad?*

*CJH*: En vez de enumerar los programas que se han propuesto o implementado, prefiero desarrollar el argumento principal: después del 11 de septiembre (de 2001) el gobierno norteamericano cambió su paradigma de un enfoque aplicado a resolver el delitos a un enfoque destinado a la prevención del delito. Este principio de prevención del crimen, de tratar de predecir e interdictar criminales, es el que impulsa casi todos los programas del gobierno hoy en dí­a.

Hay una creencia asociada a este principio que considera que la tecnologí­a puede ser usada para encontrar patrones sospechosos e identificar a los posibles criminales. Informes e investigación de todo tipo han concluido que no existe un determinado perfil del terrorista, pero los funcionarios continúan creyendo que los ordenadores tienen alguna clase de poder mí­stico capaz de resolver todos los problemas.

*HabeasData: Los norteamericanos tienen una visión diferente del derecho a la protección de datos personales vigente en Europa y en algunos paí­ses de América Latina. * ¿Podrí­a explicarnos a qué se debe ello?*

*CJH*: La primera muestra en el Museo del Holocausto en Washington DC exhibí­a una Maquina Hollerith (“Hollerith Machine”), una computadora para realizar censos se usó para recolectar datos personales. Los alemanes recolectaban información personal en tarjetas perforadas que luego alimentaban estas máquinas y usaban esta información para incrementar la eficacia del Holocausto. Los análisis históricos del Holocausto demuestran que los alemanes fueron mas efectivos en los estados donde existí­a alta participación de la población en el censo. La historia del Holocausto ayudó a formar la visión y el enfoque que los europeos tienen sobre la relación existente entre datos personales y control estatal.

En los Estados Unidos tuvimos la oportunidad de adoptar un amplio conjunto de derechos y protecciones para la información personal. Estados Unidos comenzó en el año 1974 aprobado la ley conocida como la “Privacy Act of 1974″:http://www.usdoj.gov/foia/privstat.htm, que estableció normas sobre protección de datos en poder del Estado. Luego una comisión de estudio creada por una ley concluyó que esas protecciones debí­an extenderse al sector privado, pero el Congreso nunca transformó en ley esta recomendación.

Al mismo tiempo, las empresas privadas que recolectaban y usaban datos personales se organizaron y se opusieron férreamente a una ley de privacidad. En los años recientes, las empresas de venta de datos personales se han vuelto muy sofisticadas en su oposición y lobby en contra de una ley general de privacidad. Hay una gran diferencia entre las leyes de privacidad aprobadas en la década del ochenta y comienzos de los noventa y las leyes que se consideran hoy en dí­a. Sigo convencido que leyes tales como las que regula a las empresas de informes comerciales (“Fair Credit Reporting Act of 1970″:http://www.ftc.gov/os/statutes/031224fcra.pdf), que incorporan todos los principios de protección de datos básicos (Fair Information Practices), no generarí­an ni siquiera una audiencia en el congreso hoy en dí­a. La industria está simplemente muy bien organizada y fondeada en su lobby, y quieren limitar la cuestión de la privacidad solamente al otorgamiento de una simple opción y una notificación al consumidor.

*HabeasData: Estas diferencias en protección de la privacidad entre Estados Unidos y el modelo europeo, adoptado en América Latina deberí­an haber llevado a mayor protección en estos últimos paí­ses. Sin embargo, la “empresa Choicepoint”:http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/techpolicy/2003-09-01-choicepoint_x.htm “fue capaz de recolectar y vender datos personales de millones de latinoamericanos”:http://www.epic.org/privacy/choicepoint/#documents al gobierno de los Estados Unidos. * ¿Cómo empezó esto? * ¿Donde estamos ahora?*

*CJH*: Empezó porque ellos pudieron recolectar esta información personal. Las prácticas actuales de las empresas y su tecnologí­a están mucho mas avanzadas respecto de lo que el público en general entiende o conoce y del marco legal vigente. Si hay ambigí¼edades en la ley, o si no hay ley alguna aprobada, las empresas dedicadas a comerciar con la información van a tomar ventaja de esta situación y recolectar datos personales.

Pero estoy convencido que la empresa “Choicepoint”:http://www.choicepoint.com/ será la gran ganadora respecto de las recientes fallas de seguridad ocurridas y el “acuerdo logrado con la Federal Trade Commission”:http://www.ftc.gov/opa/2006/01/choicepoint.htm “(ver Nota CNET)”:http://news.com.com/ChoicePoint+to+pay+15+million+over+data+leak/2100-7350_3-6031629.html.Desde la perspectiva legal, Choicepoint tiene una infraestructura mas sofisticada y muchos de sus competidores se -subirán- a los estándares establecidos por el Acuerdo con la FTC. Dentro de diez años, Choicepoint será el data broker mas importante, y es muy probable que todas sus operaciones comerciales funciones bajo el manto de la Federal Fair Credit Reporting Act.

*HabeasData: * ¿Porqué los Estados Unidos aun no ha reconocido un derecho constitucional a la privacidad sobre los datos personales?*

*CJH*: Bueno, en el “año 1976 la Corte Suprema de Estados Unidos”:http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/cgi-bin/getcase.pl?navby=case&court=us&vol=425&invol=435 sostuvo que los individuos no tienen un derecho a la privacidad sobre los datos que voluntariamente han dado a terceros. Esto es lo que se conoce como el -paradigma del secreto- (“secrecy paradigm”), la idea de que la información sólo es privada si nadie mas la conoce…

En la práctica, esto significó que el Estado puede ir a las empresas y solicitarles información personal acerca de sus clientes sin el consentimiento de éstos y sobre todo sin una orden o un pedido judicial que lo autorice. De hecho, desde el 11 de Septiembre, muchas empresas han ofrecido voluntariamente al Gobierno su base de datos personales.

* ¿Porque ocurrió esto? Bueno, los derechos procesales penales y los relacionados con la Primera Enmienda experimentaron una gran expansión durante las décadas de 1950 a 1970. Luego de este perí­odo la Corte Suprema se volvió mas conservadora, e intentó limitar muchos de estos derechos.

*HabeasData: * ¿A quién le teme mas en términos de futuras amenazas a la privacidad: al sector público o al sector privado? * ¿Porqué?*

*CJH*: Yo no creo que se pueda hacer una distinción entre las amenazas del sector pública y las amenazas del sector privado. El sector privado se mostró mas que dispuesto a dar datos personales de clientes al gobierno. Uno no puede confiar ni en el sector privado ni en el sector público cuando se trata de datos personales. La primera meta del sector privado es incrementar las ganancias de sus accionistas, y los actores públicos no quieren imponer lí­mites a la posibilidad de usar esa información personal.

*HabeasData: Hablemos de “medidas de protección tecnológicas (DRM) y derecho a la privacidad”:http://www.epic.org/privacy/drm/: Ud. ha investigado esta novedosa área del derecho. * ¿Cree que nos dirigimos hacia un mundo donde no existirá mas el consumo anónimo de contenidos digitales?*

*CJH*: Los “DRM están amenazando el anonimato”:http://www.stlr.org/html/volume5/hoofnagle.txt, pero también lo amenaza la falta de un sistema de pagos anónimos o un sistema de pagos que provea privacidad. Hay muy pocos incentivos económicos para que las empresas creen sistemas de DRM o de pago anónimos. Estamos cada vez mas usando transacciones electrónicas (en el año 2003 por primera vez los pagos con tarjetas de débito/crédito superaron a los pagos en efectivo). Tenemos que encontrar una manera de construir sistemas de transacciones que den privacidad a sus usuarios.

*HabeasData: Gracias por su tiempo.*

Pablo A. Palazzi
* © 2006 texto y traducción Pablo Palazzi
Foro de Habeas Data -“ Derechos reservados
“www.habeasdata.org”:http://www.habeasdata.org


The Right to Privacy – Warren & Brandeis

Posted: julio 4th, 2006 | Author: | Filed under: América del norte, General, Panama | No Comments »

*The Right to Privacy*
Warren and Brandeis

Harvard Law Review.
Vol. IV December 15, cystitis 1890 No. 5
THE RIGHT TO PRIVACY[*] .

“It could be done only on principles of private justice, page moral fitness, remedy and public convenience, which, when applied to a new subject, make common law without a precedent; much more when received and approved by usage.” -” Willes, J., in Millar v. Taylor, 4 Burr. 2303, 2312

That the individual shall have full protection in person and in property is a principle as old as the common law; but it has been found necessary from time to time to define anew the exact nature and extent of such protection. Political, social, and economic changes entail the recognition of new rights, and the common law, in its eternal youth, grows to meet the new demands of society. Thus, in very early times, the law gave a remedy only for physical interference with life and property, for trespasses vi et armis. Then the “right to life” served only to protect the subject from battery in its various forms; liberty meant freedom from actual restraint; and the right to property secured to the individual his lands and his cattle. Later, there came a recognition of man’s spiritual nature, of his feelings and his intellect. Gradually the scope of these legal rights broadened; and now the right to life has come to mean the right to enjoy life, — the right to be let alone; the right to liberty secures the exercise of extensive civil privileges; and the term “property” has grown to comprise every form of possession — intangible, as well as tangible.

Thus, with the recognition of the legal value of sensations, the protection against actual bodily injury was extended to prohibit mere attempts to do such injury; that is, the putting another in fear of such injury. From the action of battery grew that of assault.[1] Much later there came a qualified protection of the individual against offensive noises and odors, against dust and smoke, and excessive vibration. The law of nuisance was developed.[2] So regard for human emotions soon extended the scope of personal immunity beyond the body of the individual. His reputation, the standing among his fellow-men, was considered, and the law of slander and libel arose.[3] Man’s family relations became a part of the legal conception of his life, and the alienation of a wife’s affections was held remediable.[4] Occasionally the law halted, as in its refusal to recognize the intrusion by seduction upon the honor of the family. But even here the demands of society were met. A mean fiction, the action per quod servitium amisit, was resorted to, and by allowing damages for injury to the parents’ feelings, an adequate remedy was ordinarily afforded.[5] Similar to the expansion of the right to life was the growth of the legal conception of property. From corporeal property arose the incorporeal rights issuing out of it; and then there opened the wide realm of intangible property, in the products and processes of the mind,[6] as works of literature and art, [7] goodwill,[8] trade secrets, and trademarks.[9]

This development of the law was inevitable. The intense intellectual and emotional life, and the heightening of sensations which came with the advance of civilization, made it clear to men that only a part of the pain, pleasure, and profit of life lay in physical things. Thoughts, emotions, and sensations demanded legal recognition, and the beautiful capacity for growth which characterizes the common law enabled the judges to afford the requisite protection, without the interposition of the legislature.

Recent inventions and business methods call attention to the next step which must be taken for the protection of the person, and for securing to the individual what Judge Cooley calls the right “to be let alone” [10] Instantaneous photographs and newspaper enterprise have invaded the sacred precincts of private and domestic life; and numerous mechanical devices threaten to make good the prediction that “what is whispered in the closet shall be proclaimed from the house-tops.” For years there has been a feeling that the law must afford some remedy for the unauthorized circulation of portraits of private persons;[11] and the evil of invasion of privacy by the newspapers, long keenly felt, has been but recently discussed by an able writer.[12] The alleged facts of a somewhat notorious case brought before an inferior tribunal in New York a few months ago,[13] directly involved the consideration of the right of circulating portraits; and the question whether our law will recognize and protect the right to privacy in this and in other respects must soon come before our courts for consideration.

Of the desirability — indeed of the necessity — of some such protection, there can, it is believed, be no doubt. The press is overstepping in every direction the obvious bounds of propriety and of decency. Gossip is no longer the resource of the idle and of the vicious, but has become a trade, which is pursued with industry as well as effrontery. To satisfy a prurient taste the details of sexual relations are spread broadcast in the columns of the daily papers. To occupy the indolent, column upon column is filled with idle gossip, which can only be procured by intrusion upon the domestic circle. The intensity and complexity of life, attendant upon advancing civilization, have rendered necessary some retreat from the world, and man, under the refining influence of culture, has become more sensitive to publicity, so that solitude and privacy have become more essential to the individual; but modern enterprise and invention have, through invasions upon his privacy, subjected him to mental pain and distress, far greater than could be inflicted by mere bodily injury. Nor is the harm wrought by such invasions confined to the suffering of those who may be the subjects of journalistic or other enterprise. In this, as in other branches of commerce, the supply creates the demand. Each crop of unseemly gossip, thus harvested, becomes the seed of more, and, in direct proportion to its circulation, results in the lowering of social standards and of morality. Even gossip apparently harmless, when widely and persistently circulated, is potent for evil. It both belittles and perverts. It belittles by inverting the relative importance of things, thus dwarfing the thoughts and aspirations of a people. When personal gossip attains the dignity of print, and crowds the space available for matters of real interest to the community, what wonder that the ignorant and thoughtless mistake its relative importance. Easy of comprehension, appealing to that weak side of human nature which is never wholly cast down by the misfortunes and frailties of our neighbors, no one can be surprised that it usurps the place of interest in brains capable of other things. Triviality destroys at once robustness of thought and delicacy of feeling. No enthusiasm can flourish, no generous impulse can survive under its blighting influence.

It is our purpose to consider whether the existing law affords a principle which can properly be invoked to protect the privacy of the individual; and, if it does, what the nature and extent of such protection is.

Owing to the nature of the instruments by which privacy is invaded, the injury inflicted bears a superficial resemblance to the wrongs dealt with by the law of slander and of libel, while a legal remedy for such injury seems to involve the treatment of mere wounded feelings, as a substantive cause of action. The principle on which the law of defamation rests, covers, however, a radically different class of effects from those for which attention is now asked. It deals only with damage to reputation, with the injury done to the individual in his external relations to the community, by lowering him in the estimation of his fellows. The matter published of him, however widely circulated, and however unsuited to publicity, must, in order to be actionable, have a direct tendency to injure him in his intercourse with others, and even if in writing or in print, must subject him to the hatred, ridicule, or contempt of his fellowmen, — the effect of the publication upon his estimate of himself and upon his own feelings nor forming an essential element in the cause of action. In short, the wrongs and correlative rights recognized by the law of slander and libel are in their nature material rather than spiritual. That branch of the law simply extends the protection surrounding physical property to certain of the conditions necessary or helpful to worldly prosperity. On the other hand, our law recognizes no principle upon which compensation can be granted for mere injury to the feelings. However painful the mental effects upon another of an act, though purely wanton or even malicious, yet if the act itself is otherwise lawful, the suffering inflicted is dannum absque injuria. Injury of feelings may indeed be taken account of in ascertaining the amount of damages when attending what is recognized as a legal injury;[14] but our system, unlike the Roman law, does not afford a remedy even for mental suffering which results from mere contumely and insult, but from an intentional and unwarranted violation of the “honor” of another.[15]

It is not however necessary, in order to sustain the view that the common law recognizes and upholds a principle applicable to cases of invasion of privacy, to invoke the analogy, which is but superficial, to injuries sustained, either by an attack upon reputation or by what the civilians called a violation of honor; for the legal doctrines relating to infractions of what is ordinarily termed the common-law right to intellectual and artistic property are, it is believed, but instances and applications of a general right to privacy, which properly understood afford a remedy for the evils under consideration.

The common law secures to each individual the right of determining, ordinarily, to what extent his thoughts, sentiments, and emotions shall be communicated to others.[16] Under our system of government, he can never be compelled to express them (except when upon the witness stand); and even if he has chosen to give them expression, he generally retains the power to fix the limits of the publicity which shall be given them. The existence of this right does not depend upon the particular method of expression adopted. It is immaterial whether it be by word[17] or by signs,[18] in painting,[19] by sculpture, or in music.[20] Neither does the existence of the right depend upon the nature or value of the thought or emotions, nor upon the excellence of the means of expression.[21] The same protection is accorded to a casual letter or an entry in a diary and to the most valuable poem or essay, to a botch or daub and to a masterpiece. In every such case the individual is entitled to decide whether that which is his shall be given to the public.[22] No other has the right to publish his productions in any form, without his consent. This right is wholly independent of the material on which, the thought, sentiment, or emotions is expressed. It may exist independently of any corporeal being, as in words spoken, a song sung, a drama acted. Or if expressed on any material, as in a poem in writing, the author may have parted with the paper, without forfeiting any proprietary right in the composition itself. The right is lost only when the author himself communicates his production to the public, — in other words, publishes it.[23] It is entirely independent of the copyright laws, and their extension into the domain of art. The aim of those statutes is to secure to the author, composer, or artist the entire profits arising from publication; but the common-law protection enables him to control absolutely the act of publication, and in the exercise of his own discretion, to decide whether there shall be any publication at all.[24] The statutory right is of no value, unless there is a publication; the common-law right is lost as soon as there is a publication.

What is the nature, the basis, of this right to prevent the publication of manuscripts or works of art? It is stated to be the enforcement of a right of property;[25] and no difficulty arises in accepting this view, so long as we have only to deal with the reproduction of literary and artistic compositions. They certainly possess many of the attributes of ordinary property; they are transferable; they have a value; and publication or reproduction is a use by which that value is realized. But where the value of the production is found not in the right to take the profits arising from publication, but in the peace of mind or the relief afforded by the ability to prevent any publication at all, it is difficult to regard the right as one of property, in the common acceptation of that term. A man records in a letter to his son, or in his diary, that he did not dine with his wife on a certain day. No one into whose hands those papers fall could publish them to the world, even if possession of the documents had been obtained rightfully; and the prohibition would not be confined to the publication of a copy of the letter itself, or of the diary entry; the restraint extends also to a publication of the contents. What is the thing which is protected? Surely, not the intellectual act of recording the fact that the husband did not dine with his wife, but that fact itself. It is not the intellectual product, but the domestic occurrence. A man writes a dozen letters to different people. No person would be permitted to publish a list of the letters written. If the letters or the contents of the diary were protected as literary compositions, the scope of the protection afforded should be the same secured to a published writing under the copyright law. But the copyright law would not prevent an enumeration of the letters, or the publication of some of the facts contained therein. The copyright of a series of paintings or etchings would prevent a reproduction of the paintings as pictures; but it would not prevent a publication of list or even a description of them.[26] Yet in the famous case of Prince Albert v. Strange, the court held that the common-law rule prohibited not merely the reproduction of the etchings which the plaintiff and Queen Victoria had made for their own pleasure, but also “the publishing (at least by printing or writing), though not by copy or resemblance, a description of them, whether more or less limited or summary, whether in the form of a catalogue or otherwise.”[27] Likewise, an unpublished collection of news possessing no element of a literary nature is protected from privacy.[28]

That this protection cannot rest upon the right to literary or artistic property in any exact sense, appears the more clearly when the subject-matter for which protection is invoked is not even in the form of intellectual property, but has the attributes of ordinary tangible property. Suppose a man has a collection of gems or curiosities which he keeps private : it would hardly be contended that any person could publish a catalogue of them, and yet the articles enumerated are certainly not intellectual property in the legal sense, any more than a collection of stoves or of chairs.[29]

The belief that the idea of property in its narrow sense was the basis of the protection of unpublished manuscripts led an able court to refuse, in several cases, injunctions against the publication of private letters, on the ground that “letters not possessing the attributes of literary compositions are not property entitled to protection;” and that it was “evident the plaintiff could not have considered the letters as of any value whatever as literary productions, for a letter cannot be considered of value to the author which he never would consent to have published.”[30] But those decisions have not been followed,[31] and it may not be considered settled that the protection afforded by the common law to the author of any writing is entirely independent of its pecuniary value, its intrinsic merits, or of any intention to publish the same and, of course, also, wholly independent of the material, if any, upon which, or the mode in which, the thought or sentiment was expressed.

Although the courts have asserted that they rested their decisions on the narrow grounds of protection to property, yet there are recognitions of a more liberal doctrine. Thus in the case of Prince Albert v. Strange, already referred to, the opinions of both the Vice-Chancellor and of the Lord Chancellor, on appeal, show a more or less clearly defined perception of a principle broader than those which were mainly discussed, and on which they both place their chief reliance. Vice-Chancellor Knight Bruce referred to publishing of a man that he had “written to particular persons or on particular subjects” as an instance of possibly injurious disclosures as to private matters, that the courts would in a proper case prevent; yet it is difficult to perceive how, in such a case, any right of privacy, in the narrow sense, would be drawn in question, or why, if such a publication would be restrained when it threatened to expose the victim not merely to sarcasm, but to ruin, it should not equally be enjoined, if it threatened to embitter his life. To deprive a man of the potential profits to be realized by publishing a catalogue of his gems cannot per se be a wrong to him. The possibility of future profits is not a right of property which the law ordinarily recognizes; it must, therefore, be an infraction of other rights which constitutes the wrongful act, and that infraction is equally wrongful, whether its results are to forestall the profits that the individual himself might secure by giving the matter a publicity obnoxious to him, or to gain an advantage at the expense of his mental pain and suffering. If the fiction of property in a narrow sense must be preserved, it is still true that the end accomplished by the gossip-monger is attained by the use of that which is another’s, the facts relating to his private life, which he has seen fit to keep private. Lord Cottenham stated that a man “is that which is exclusively his,” and cited with approval the opinion of Lord Eldon, as reported in a manuscript note of the case of Wyatt v. Wilson, in 1820, respecting an engraving of George the Third during his illness, to the effect that “if one of the late king’s physicians had kept a diary of what he heard and saw, the court would not, in the king’s lifetime, have permitted him to print and publish it; “and Lord Cottenham declared, in respect to the acts of the defendants in the case before him, that “privacy is the right invaded.” But if privacy is once recognized as a right entitled to legal protection, the interposition of the courts cannot depend on the particular nature of the injuries resulting.

These considerations lead to the conclusion that the protection afforded to thoughts, sentiments, and emotions, expressed through the medium of writing or of the arts, so far as it consists in preventing publication, is merely an instance of the enforcement of the more general right of the individual to be let alone. It is like the right not be assaulted or beaten, the right not be imprisoned, the right not to be maliciously prosecuted, the right not to be defamed. In each of these rights, as indeed in all other rights recognized by the law, there inheres the quality of being owned or possessed — and (as that is the distinguishing attribute of property) there may some propriety in speaking of those rights as property. But, obviously, they bear little resemblance to what is ordinarily comprehended under that term. The principle which protects personal writings and all other personal productions, not against theft and physical appropriation, but against publication in any form, is in reality not the principle of private property, but that of an inviolate personality.[32]

If we are correct in this conclusion, the existing law affords a principle from which may be invoked to protect the privacy of the individual from invasion either by the too enterprising press, the photographer, or the possessor of any other modern device for rewording or reproducing scenes or sounds. For the protection afforded is not confined by the authorities to those cases where any particular medium or form of expression has been adopted, not to products of the intellect. The same protection is afforded to emotions and sensations expressed in a musical composition or other work of art as to a literary composition; and words spoken, a pantomime acted, a sonata performed, is no less entitled to protection than if each had been reduced to writing. The circumstance that a thought or emotion has been recorded in a permanent form renders its identification easier, and hence may be important from the point of view of evidence, but it has no significance as a matter of substantive right. If, then, the decisions indicate a general right to privacy for thoughts, emotions, and sensations, these should receive the same protection, whether expressed in writing, or in conduct, in conversation, in attitudes, or in facial expression.

It may be urged that a distinction should be taken between the deliberate expression of thoughts and emotions in literary or artistic compositions and the casual and often involuntary expression given to them in the ordinary conduct of life. In other words, it may be contended that the protection afforded is granted to the conscious products of labor, perhaps as an encouragement to effort.[33] This contention, however plausible, has, in fact, little to recommend it. If the amount of labor involved be adopted as the test, we might well find that the effort to conduct one’s self properly in business and in domestic relations had been far greater than that involved in painting a picture or writing a book; one would find that it was far easier to express lofty sentiments in a diary than in the conduct of a noble life. If the test of deliberateness of the act be adopted, much casual correspondence which is now accorded full protection would be excluded from the beneficent operation of existing rules. After the decisions denying the distinction attempted to be made between those literary productions which it was intended to publish and those which it was not, all considerations of the amount of labor involved, the degree of deliberation, the value of the product, and the intention of publishing must be abandoned, and no basis is discerned upon which the right to restrain publication and reproduction of such so-called literary and artistic works can be rested, except the right to privacy, as a part of the more general right to the immunity of the person, — the right to one’s personality.

It should be stated that, in some instances where protection has been afforded against wrongful publication, the jurisdiction has been asserted, not on the ground of property, or at least not wholly on that ground, but upon the ground of an alleged breach of an implied contract or of a trust or confidence.

Thus, in Abernethy v. Hutchinson, 3 L. J. Ch. 209 (1825), where the plaintiff, a distinguished surgeon, sought to restrain the publication in the “Lancet” of unpublished lectures which he had delivered as St. Bartholomew’s Hospital in London, Lord Eldon doubted whether there could be property in lectures which had not been reduced to writing, but granted the injunction on the ground of breach of confidence, holding “that when persons were admitted as pupils or otherwise, to hear these lectures, although they were orally delivered, and although the parties might go to the extent, if they were able to do so, of putting down the whole by means of short-hand, yet they could do that only for the purposes of their own information, and could not publish, for profit, that which they had not obtained the right of selling.”

In Prince Albert v. Strange, I McN. & G. 25 (1849), Lord Cottenham, on appeal, while recognizing a right of property in the etchings which of itself would justify the issuance of the injunction, stated, after discussing the evidence, that he was bound to assume that the possession of the etching by the defendant had “its foundation in a breach of trust, confidence, or contract,” and that upon such ground also the plaintiff’s title to the injunction was fully sustained.

In Tuck v. Priester, 19 Q.B.D. 639 (1887), the plaintiffs were owners of a picture, and employed the defendant to make a certain number of copies. He did so, and made also a number of other copies for himself, and offered them for sale in England at a lower price. Subsequently, the plaintiffs registered their copyright in the picture, and then brought suit for an injunction and damages. The Lords Justices differed as to the application of the copyright acts to the case, but held unanimously that independently of those acts, the plaintiffs were entitled to an injunction and damages for breach of contract.

In Pollard v. Photographic Co., 40 Ch. Div. 345 (1888), a photographer who had taken a lady’s photograph under the ordinary circumstances was restrained from exhibiting it, and also from selling copies of it, on the ground that it was a breach of an implied term in the contract, and also that it was a breach of confidence. Mr. Justice North interjected in the argument of the plaintiff’s counsel the inquiry: “Do you dispute that if the negative likeness were taken on the sly, the person who took it might exhibit copies?” and counsel for the plaintiff answered: “In that case there would be no trust or consideration to support a contract.” Later, the defendant’s counsel argued that “a person has no property in his own features; short of doing what is libellous or otherwise illegal, there is no restriction on the photographer’s using his negative.” But the court, while expressly finding a breach of contract and of trust sufficient to justify its interposition, still seems to have felt the necessity of resting the decision also upon a right of property,[34] in order to bring it within the line of those cases which were relied upon as precedents.[35]

This process of implying a term in a contract, or of implying a trust (particularly where a contract is written, and where these is no established usage or custom), is nothing more nor less than a judicial declaration that public morality, private justice, and general convenience demand the recognition of such a rule, and that the publication under similar circumstances would be considered an intolerable abuse. So long as these circumstances happen to present a contract upon which such a term can be engrafted by the judicial mind, or to supply relations upon which a trust or confidence can be erected, there may be no objection to working out the desired protection though the doctrines of contract or of trust. But the court can hardly stop there. The narrower doctrine may have satisfied the demands of society at a time when the abuse to be guarded against could rarely have arisen without violating a contract or a special confidence; but now that modern devices afford abundant opportunities for the perpetration of such wrongs without any participation by the injured party, the protection granted by the law must be placed upon a broader foundation. While, for instance, the state of the photographic art was such that one’s picture could seldom be taken without his consciously “sitting” for the purpose, the law of contract or of trust might afford the prudent man sufficient safeguards against the improper circulation of his portrait; but since the latest advances in photographic art have rendered it possible to take pictures surreptitiously, the doctrines of contract and of trust are inadequate to support the required protection, and the law of tort must be resorted to. The right of property in its widest sense, including all possession, including all rights and privileges, and hence embracing the right to an inviolate personality, affords alone that broad basis upon which the protection which the individual demands can be rested.

Thus, the courts, in searching for some principle upon which the publication of private letters could be enjoined, naturally came upon the ideas of a breach of confidence, and of an implied contract; but it required little consideration to discern that this doctrine could not afford all the protection required, since it would not support the court in granting a remedy against a stranger; and so the theory of property in the contents of letters was adopted.[36] Indeed, it is difficult to conceive on what theory of the law the casual recipient of a letter, who proceeds to publish it, is guilty of a breach of contract, express or implied, or of any breach of trust, in the ordinary acceptation of that term. Suppose a letter has been addressed to him without his solicitation. He opens it, and reads. Surely, he has not made any contract; he has not accepted any trust. He cannot, by opening and reading the letter, have come under any obligation save what the law declares; and, however expressed, that obligation is simply to observe the legal right of the sender, whatever it may be, and whether it be called his right or property in the contents of the letter, or his right to privacy.[37]

A similar groping for the principle upon which a wrongful publication can be enjoined is found in the law of trade secrets. There, injunctions have generally been granted on the theory of a breach of contract, or of an abuse of confidence.[38] It would, of course, rarely happen that any one would be in possession of a secret unless confidence had been reposed in him. But can it be supposed that the court would hesitate to grant relief against one who had obtained his knowledge by an ordinary trespass, — for instance, by wrongfully looking into a book in which the secret was recorded, or by eavesdropping? Indeed, in Yovatt v. Winyard, I J.&W. 394 (1820), where an injunction was granted against making any use or of communicating certain recipes for veterinary medicine, it appeared that the defendant while in the plaintiff’s employ, had surreptitiously got access to his book of recipes, and copied them. Lord Eldon “granted the injunction, upon the ground of there having been a breach of trust and confidence;” but it would seem difficult to draw any sound legal distinction between such a case and one where a mere stranger wrongfully obtained access to the book.[39]

We must therefore conclude that the rights, so protected, whatever their exact nature, are not rights arising from contract or from special trust, but are rights as against the world; and, as above stated, the principle which has been applied to protect these rights is in reality not the principle of private property, unless that word be used in an extended and unusual sense. The principle which protects personal writings and any other productions of the intellect of or the emotions, is the right to privacy, and the law has no new principle to formulate when it extends this protection to the personal appearance, sayings, acts, and to personal relation, domestic or otherwise.[40]

If the invasion of privacy constitutes a legal injuria, the elements for demanding redress exist, since already the value of mental suffering, caused by an act wrongful in itself, is recognized as a basis for compensation.

The right of one who has remained a private individual, to prevent his public portraiture, presents the simplest case for such extension; the right to protect one’s self from pen portraiture, from a discussion by the press of one’s private affairs, would be a more important and far-reaching one. If casual and unimportant statements in a letter, if handiwork, however inartistic and valueless, if possessions of all sorts are protected not only against reproduction, but also against description and enumeration, how much more should the acts and sayings of a man in his social and domestic relations be guarded from ruthless publicity. If you may not reproduce a woman’s face photographically without her consent, how much less should be tolerated the reproduction of her face, her form, and her actions, by graphic descriptions colored to suit a gross and depraved imagination.

The right to privacy, limited as such right must necessarily be, has already found expression in the law of France.[41]

It remains to consider what are the limitations of this right to privacy, and what remedies may be granted for the enforcement of the right. To determine in advance of experience the exact line at which the dignity and convenience of the individual must yield to the demands of the public welfare or of private justice would be a difficult task; but the more general rules are furnished by the legal analogies already developed in the law of slander and libel, and in the law of literary and artistic property.

1. The right to privacy does not prohibit any publication of matter which is of public or general interest. In determining the scope of this rule, aid would be afforded by the analogy, in the law of libel and slander, of cases which deal with the qualified privilege of comment and criticism on matters of public and general interest.[42] There are of course difficulties in applying such a rule; but they are inherent in the subject-matter, and are certainly no greater than those which exist in many other branches of the law, — for instance, in that large class of cases in which the reasonableness or unreasonableness of an act is made the test of liability. The design of the law must be to protect those persons with whose affairs the community has no legitimate concern, from being dragged into an undesirable and undesired publicity and to protect all persons, whatsoever; their position or station, from having matters which they may properly prefer to keep private, made public against their will. It is the unwarranted invasion of individual privacy which is reprehended, and to be, so far as possible, prevented. The distinction, however, noted in the above statement is obvious and fundamental. There are persons who may reasonably claim as a right, protection from the notoriety entailed by being made the victims of journalistic enterprise. There are others who, in varying degrees, have renounced the right to live their lives screened from public observation. Matters which men of the first class may justly contend, concern themselves alone, may in those of the second be the subject of legitimate interest to their fellow-citizens. Peculiarities of manner and person, which in the ordinary individual should be free from comment, may acquire a public importance, if found in a candidate for public office. Some further discrimination is necessary, therefore, than to class facts or deeds as public or private according to a standard to be applied to the fact or deed per se. To publish of a modest and retiring individual that he suffers from an impediment in his speech or that he cannot spell correctly, is an unwarranted, if not an unexampled, infringement of his rights, while to state and comment on the same characteristics found in a would-be congressman could not be regarded as beyond the pale of propriety.

The general object in view is to protect the privacy of private life, and to whatever degree and in whatever connection a man’s life has ceased to be private, before the publication under consideration has been made, to that extent the protection is likely to be withdrawn.[43] Since, then, the propriety of publishing the very same facts may depend wholly upon the person concerning whom they are published, no fixed formula can be used to prohibit obnoxious publications. Any rule of liability adopted must have in it an elasticity which shall take account of the varying circumstances of each case, — a necessity which unfortunately renders such a doctrine not only more difficult of application, but also to a certain extent uncertain in its operation and easily rendered abortive. Besides, it is only the more flagrant breaches of decency and propriety that could in practice be reached, and it is not perhaps desirable even to attempt to repress everything which the nicest taste and keenest sense of the respect due to private life would condemn.

In general, then, the matters of which the publication should be repressed may be described as those which concern the private life, habits, acts, and relations of an individual, and have no legitimate connection with his fitness for a public office which he seeks or for which he is suggested, or for any public or quasi public position which he seeks or for which he is suggested, and have no legitimate relation to or bearing upon any act done by him in a public or quasi public capacity. The foregoing is not designed as a wholly accurate or exhaustive definition, since that which must ultimately in a vast number of cases become a question of individual judgment and opinion is incapable of such definition; but it is an attempt to indicate broadly the class of matters referred to. Some things all men alike are entitled to keep from popular curiosity, whether in public life or not, while others are only private because the persons concerned have not assumed a position which makes their doings legitimate matters of public investigation.[44]

2. The right to privacy does not prohibit the communication of any matter, though in its nature private, when the publication is made under circumstances which would render it a privileged communication according to the law of slander and libel. Under this rule, the right to privacy is not invaded by any publication made in a court of justice, in legislative bodies, or the committees of those bodies; in municipal assemblies, or the committees of such assemblies, or practically by any communication in any other public body, municipal or parochial, or in any body quasi public, like the large voluntary associations formed for almost every purpose of benevolence, business, or other general interest; and (at least in many jurisdictions) reports of any such proceedings would in some measure be accorded a like privilege.[45] Nor would the rule prohibit any publication made by one in the discharge of some public or private duty, whether legal or moral, or in conduct of one’s own affairs, in matters where his own interest is concerned.[46]

3. The law would probably not grant any redress for the invasion of privacy by oral publication in the absence of special damage. The same reasons exist for distinguishing between oral and written publications of private matters, as is afforded in the law of defamation by the restricted liability for slander as compared with the liability for libel.[47] The injury resulting from such oral communications would ordinarily be so trifling that the law might well, in the interest of free speech, disregard it altogether.[48]

4. The right to privacy ceases upon the publication of the facts by the individual, or with his consent.

This is but another application of the rule which has become familiar in the law of literary and artistic property. The cases there decided establish also what should be deemed a publication, — the important principle in this connection being that a private communication of circulation for a restricted purpose is not a publication within the meaning of the law.[49]

5. The truth of the matter published does not afford a defence. Obviously this branch of the law should have no concern with the truth or falsehood of the matters published. It is not for injury to the individual’s character that redress or prevention is sought, but for injury to the right of privacy. For the former, the law of slander and libel provides perhaps a sufficient safeguard. The latter implies the right not merely to prevent inaccurate portrayal of private life, but to prevent its being depicted at all.[50]

6. The absence of “malice” in the publisher does not afford a defence. Personal ill-will is not an ingredient of the offence, any more than in an ordinary case of trespass to person or to property. Such malice is never necessary to be shown in an action for libel or slander at common law, except in rebuttal of some defence, e.g., that the occasion rendered the communication privileged, or, under the statutes in this State and elsewhere, that the statement complained of was true. The invasion of the privacy that is to be protected is equally complete and equally injurious, whether the motives by which the speaker or writer was actuated are taken by themselves, culpable or not; just as the damage to character, and to some extent the tendency to provoke a breach of the peace, is equally the result of defamation without regard to motives leading to its publication. Viewed as a wrong to the individual, this rule is the same pervading the whole law of torts, by which one is held responsible for his intentional acts, even thought they care committed with no sinister intent; and viewed as a wrong to society, it is the same principle adopted in a large category of statutory offences.

The remedies for an invasion of the right of privacy are also suggested by those administered in the law of defamation, and in the law of literary and artistic property, namely: –

1. An action of tort for damages in all cases.[51] Even in the absence of special damages, substantial compensation could be allowed for injury to feelings as in the action of slander and libel.

2. An injunction, in perhaps a very limited class of cases.[52]

It would doubtless be desirable that the privacy of the individual should receive the added protection of the criminal law, but for this, legislation would be required.[53] Perhaps it would be deemed proper to bring the criminal liability for such publication within narrower limits; but that the community has an interest in preventing such invasions of privacy, sufficiently strong to justify the introduction of such a remedy, cannot be doubted. Still, the protection of society must come mainly through a recognition of the rights of the individual. Each man is responsible for his own acts and omissions only. If he condones what he reprobates, with a weapon at hand equal to his defence, he is responsible for the results. If he resists, public opinion will rally to his support. Has he then such a weapon? It is believed that the common law provides him with one, forged in the slow fire of the centuries, and to-day fitly tempered to his hand. The common law has always recognized a man’s house as his castle, impregnable, often, even to his own officers engaged in the execution of its command. Shall the courts thus close the front entrance to constituted authority, and open wide the back door to idle or prurient curiosity?

Samuel D. Warren,

Louis D. Brandeis.

BOSTON, December, 1890.

[downloaded 18 May 1996 from an internet site hosted by Stephen R. Laniel; and reformatted]


Interview with Chris Hoofnagle

Posted: julio 4th, 2006 | Author: | Filed under: América del norte, Competencia judicial, General, Público en general | No Comments »

*Interview with Chris Hoofnagle*

“Chris Jay Hoofnagle”:http://choof.org/ is a privacy expert and lawyer admitted to practice law in California and DC. Currently, doctor he is non-residential fellow at Stanford University’s Center for Internet and Society and a consultant on privacy litigation. Until recently he worked at the Electronic Privacy Information Center, where he was in charge of the organization of EPIC West Coast Office. He had testified before Congress, the California Legislature, and before the Judicial Conference of the United States on various privacy issues. His academic articles on the First Amendment and privacy “are online at the SSRN web site”:http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/results.cfm.

See “Spanish version here”:http://www.habeasdata.org/Entrevista_Chris_Hoofnagle.

*HabeasData: Can you tell us about your work in privacy? How did you started to be interested in privacy issues?*

*CJH:* Back in the 1990s, direct marketers were seen as a serious privacy threat, in part, because they might take troves of consumer transactional information and sell it to law enforcement. Officials from the Direct Marketing Association established an ethical rule barring the use of marketing data for government purposes, and emphatically argued that they would not allow their data to be sold to law enforcement. These arguments, bolstered by the “free market” types, protected the direct marketers from new federal regulation, and allowed a great trade in personal information to arise. Privacy advocates were skeptical of this trade, and I believe rightly so. I’ve always thought it naive to hold that big business poses different privacy risks than government. And, the failure to rein in data marketing companies in the 1990s led directly to the current situation, where despite past promises, almost all the companies selling personal data to the government are direct marketing operations. So, I have focused my work on commercial collection of personal information, and the nexus with law enforcement. This nexus obviously has expanded, given recent events.

*HabeasData: Privacy after 911: can you summarize, for a Latin American audience, what kind of programs/actions have been proposed/applied in the United States that may affect privacy?*

*CJH:* Rather than enumerate the various programs that have been proposed or implemented, let me just make the principal point: After 9/11, US law enforcement shifted its paradigm from a crime solving approach to one focusing on preventing crime. This principle of prevention of crime, of trying to predict and interdict criminals, drives many of the programs in the US now. There is a belief associated with this principle that technology can be used to find suspicious patterns and to identify possible criminals. Report after report has concluded that there is no reliable terrorist profile, but officials continue to believe computers have some mystical power to solve all problems.

*HabeasData: Americans have a different view of data protection than the EU and some Latin American countries. Can you explain us why?*

*CJH:* The first exhibit in the Holocaust Museum in Washington, DC features a “Hollerith Machine”:http://www3.iath.virginia.edu/holocaust/infotech.html a census tool that aggregated personal information. The Germans collected personal information on punch cards that were then fed through the machine, and used the data to increase the efficiency of the Holocaust. Historical analyses of the Holocaust showed that the Germans were more effective in states where there were high rates of participation in censuses. The history of the Holocaust informed Europeans’ views of the relationship of personal information to state control.

In the US, we did have the opportunity to adopt a comprehensive set of protections for personal information. The US started by enacting the Privacy Act of 1974, which created procedural and some substantive protections for personal information in the hands of the federal government. A study commission created by the law concluded that those protections should be extended to corporations, but Congress never enacted this recommendation.

At the same time, companies that used personal information organized and strongly opposed privacy laws. In recent years, data companies have become very sophisticated in their opposition to all privacy law. There is a marked difference between privacy laws enacted in the 1980s and early 1990s and those considered today. I remain convinced that the Fair Credit Reporting Act of 1970, which incorporates all Fair Information Practices, would not even get a hearing in today’s Congress. The industry is simply too well organized and well funded, and they want to limit privacy to giving consumers “privacy notices” and “choice.”

*HabeasData: The differences in privacy protection between the U.S. and some Latin American countries may have lead to more protection in those countries. However a company like “Choicepoint was able to gather and sell personal data from Latin Americans”:http://www.epic.org/privacy/choicepoint/#documents to the U.S. government. How did it started? Where are we now?*

*CJH:* It got started because they could collect the data. Business practices and technology are far ahead of the public’s understanding of the issues and the legal framework. If there are ambiguities in the law, or where there is no law, information companies are going to take advantage of the situation and collect personal data.

But, I am convinced that Choicepoint will be the big winner from the security breach and resulting Federal Trade Commission settlement. From a legal perspective, Choicepoint has a more sophisticated infrastructure, and many of its competitors will trip over the standards set by the FTC settlement. Ten years from now, Choicepoint will be the leading data broker, and it could be the case that its entire business operations will operate under the Federal Fair Credit Reporting Act.

*HabeasData: Why the US have not yet recognized a constitutional right to privacy in information?*

*CJH:* In “a 1976 case”:http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/cgi-bin/getcase.pl?navby=case&court=us&vol=425&invol=435, the Supreme Court held that individuals do not have a right of privacy in information voluntarily given to others. This is what we refer to as the “secrecy paradigm,” the idea that information is only private if no one else knows about it.

Practically, this means that the government can go to businesses and request personal information about customers without a subpoena or warrant. In fact, since 9/11, many businesses have volunteered to provide their databases of personal information to law enforcement.

Why is this the case? Criminal procedure and First Amendment rights experienced a great expansion from the 1950s-1970. Following this period, our Supreme Court became more conservative, and attempted to limit many of these rights.

*HabeasData: Who do you fear more in terms of privacy threats in the next years: the public or the private sector? Why?*

*CJH:* I do not believe that there is a distinction between public and private sector privacy threats anymore. The private sector has shown itself more than willing to give customer data to the government. One cannot trust the private or public sectors to balance privacy interests of consumer/citizens out of goodwill. Private actors’ first loyalty is to increasing shareholder wealth, and public actors do not want to place limits on their power to use personal information.

*HabeasData: DRM & Privacy: you* ´ve researched this nascent area of law. Are we heading towards a world of non anonymous consumption of content?*

*CJH:* DRM is threatening anonymity, but so is the lack of payment systems that provide privacy. There is very little economic incentive for businesses to create anonymous DRM or payment systems. We’re moving towards more electronic transactions (credit/debit card use surpassed cash in 2003). We have to find a way to build more privacy into transactions generally.

** · Thank you for you time,*

Pablo A. Palazzi
Foro de Habeas Data
“www.habeasdata.org”:http://www.habeasdata.org/


CUARTO SEMINARIO INTERNACIONAL sobre PROTECCION DE DATOS PERSONALES En homenaje al Profesor Doctor SPIROS SIMITIS

Posted: julio 1st, 2006 | Author: | Filed under: Argentina, Conferencias, General, Público en general | No Comments »

27, shop 28 y 29 de marzo 2 MIL 6
Buenos Aires -“ Mendoza

*CUARTO SEMINARIO INTERNACIONAL sobre PROTECCION DE DATOS PERSONALES En homenaje al Profesor Doctor SPIROS SIMITIS*
*27/3/06 – BUENOS AIRES*

10.00 horas
Acto Inaugural
Museo de Arte Hispano Americano -“ Isaac Fernández Blanco
Suipacha 1422, Buenos Aires

-¢ Inauguración a cargo de las Autoridades del Ministerio de Justicia y Derechos Humanos.
-¢ Palabras a cargo del Señor Ministro de la Corte Suprema de Justicia, Doctor Ricardo Lorenzetti.
-¢ Palabras a cargo del Señor Senador Nacional, Doctor Marcelo Guinle.
-¢ Presentación del conferenciante a cargo del Señor Director Nacional de Protección de Datos Personales, Prof. Dr. Juan Antonio Travieso.
-¢ Spiros Simitis: -Protección de Datos Personales -“ Un desafí­o incesante. Fundamentos y Perspectivas-.

28/3/06 – MENDOZA
Centro y Exposiciones -Gobernador Emilio Civit-, Sala Magna
Peltier 611, 1º piso, Mendoza, Provincia de Mendoza.

09.00 horas

Apertura oficial:
-¢ Prof. Dr. Juan Antonio Travieso, Director Nacional de Protección de Datos Personales del Ministerio de Justicia y Derechos Humanos de la Nación.
-¢ Autoridades del Ministerio de Justicia y Derechos Humanos de la Nación.
-¢ Sra. Ministra de Economí­a del Gobierno de Mendoza, Ing. Laura Montero.
-¢ Sr. Gobernador de la Provincia de Mendoza, Ing. Julio Cobos.

Conferencia magistral:
Spiro Simitis -“ -Protección de Datos Personales -“ Necesidad y limites de una aproximación internacional-

17.00 horas

Panel 1 -“ La protección de datos personales en el ámbito de la integración regional.
-¢ Lic. Mónica Lucero de Nofal – Directora de Fiscalización, Control y Defensa del Consumidor del Ministerio de Economí­a de la Provincia de Mendoza (DFCyDC)
-¢ Sr. Aní­bal Rodrí­guez -“ Asesor de Gabinete del Ministerio de Economí­a de la Provincia de Mendoza.
-¢ Dr. Pedro Pérez -“ Presidente de la Federación de Entidades Empresarias de Institutos de Informaciones Comerciales de la República Argentina (FEEICRA)
-¢ Representantes del Ministerio de Desarrollo, Industria y Comercio y del Ministerio de Justicia de la República Federativa de Brasil
-¢ Representantes del Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores, Comercio Internacional y Culto.
-¢ Moderadora: Catalina Gallardo, Abogada, Asesorí­a Letrada de la DFCyDC – Mendoza

29/3/06 – MENDOZA
Centro y Exposiciones -Gobernador Emilio Civit-, Sala Magna
Peltier 611, 1º piso, Mendoza, Provincia de Mendoza.

09.00 horas

Panel 2 -“ La protección de datos personales como herramienta de competitividad
Conferencia a cargo del Prof. Dr. Alfred Bí¼llesbach (Chief Officer Corporate Data Protection – DaimlerChrysler AG) -Data Protection for Financial Services-

-¢ Dr. Jacobo Cohen Imach -“ Gerente Regional de Legales, MercadoLibre.com
-¢ Lic. Marcos Pueyrredón -“ Presidente de la Cámara Argentina de Comercio Electrónico
-¢ Sra. Mary Teahan -“ Presidente de la Asociación de Marketing Directo e Interactivo de Argentina (AMDIA)
-¢ Moderadora: Stella De Vito, Abogada, Secretaria Técnica de la Unidad de Defensa del Consumidor y Lealtad Comercial, DFCyDC-Mendoza.

29/3/06 – MENDOZA

11.00 horas

Panel 3 -“ La seguridad informática y la protección de datos personales
-¢ Dra. Marí­a José Blanco Antón – Subdirectora General del Registro General de Protección de Datos
-¢ Ing. Pablo Anselmo -“ PriceWaterhouse Coopers.
-¢ Cdora. Marí­a Patricia Prandini -“ Directora de Aplicaciones, Oficina Nacional de Tecnologí­as de Información (ONTI)
-¢ Dr. Horacio Granero -“ Estudio Allende y Brea
-¢ Dr. Guillermo Calciati, KPMG
-¢ Ing. Rodolfo Stecco, Jefe de producto TL 9000, del Instituto Argentino de Normalización (IRAM). Presidente del Quest Forum – Región Latinoamérica.
-¢ Moderadora: Cristina Cultota, Abogada, Jefa de Asesorí­a Letrada de la DFC y DC – Mendoza

17.00 horas

Panel 4 -“ La protección de datos personales en el sector público
-¢ Dra. Marí­a Matilde Morales, Coordinadora Técnica de la Unidad de Coordinación Técnica del Consejo Nacional de Coordinación de Polí­ticas Sociales de la Presidencia de la Nación.
-¢ Dra. Marí­a José Blanco Antón – Subdirectora General del Registro General de Protección de Datos
-¢ Lic. Gustavo Bricchi -“ Gerente de Gestión de la Información del Banco Central de la República Argentina (BCRA)
-¢ Sr. Marcelo O. Barone – Jefe del Departamento Seguridad Informática, Administración Federal de Ingresos Públicos (AFIP)
-¢ Dr. Eduardo Barbier -“ Banco de la Nación Argentina
-¢ Lic. Carlos E. Achiary -“ Director Nacional, Oficina Nacional de Tecnologí­as de Información (ONTI).
-¢ Moderadora: Cecilia Martí­nez, Abogada, Asesorí­a Letrada de la DFCyDC -“ Mendoza.

19.15 horas

Panel 5 -“ La responsabilidad por el tratamiento de datos personales y el Registro Nacional de Bases de Datos
Conferencia a cargo de Joan Antokol (VP, Head, Global Privacy, Novartis Group Companies) “Update on Data Protection and Medical Research: Roles and Responsibilities of the Parties to Protect Personal Data”
-¢ Dr. Daniel Altmark -“ Director del Instituto de Informática Judicial y Derecho Informático.
-¢ Dr. Julio Pueyrredón -“ PriceWaterhouse Coopers.
-¢ Maximiliano D’Auro -“ Estudio Beccar Varela.
-¢ Dr. Pablo A. Segura -“ Coordinador Técnico Legal de la Dirección Nacional de Datos Personales del Ministerio de Justicia y Derechos Humanos de la Nación.
-¢ Dra. Marí­a Teresita Carvallo, Abogada, Estudio Ferrer Dehesa, Provincia de Córdoba.
-¢ Moderadoras: Adriana Parera, Abogada, Coordinadora de Defensa del Consumidor de la DFCyDC, Mendoza; Dra. Marí­a del Rosario Moreno, Dirección Nacional de Protección de Datos Personales.

20.30 horas

Acto de clausura
Palabras a cargo de las Autoridades Organizadoras del Seminario.

Objetivos del Seminario

El Seminario Internacional sobre Protección de Datos Personales, en su cuarta edición, apunta a fortalecer la discusión sobre temas fundamentales de la protección de datos personales.
Profundiza el aspecto regional, para fomentar desarrollos legislativos en las provincias argentinas y en Latinoamérica, con una especial focalización en el MERCOSUR.

También pretende transmitir la adopción de polí­ticas de privacidad con cultura de protección de datos personales, elemento de competitividad para establecer buenas prácticas en las empresas y la protección de los derechos para todos.

La Dirección Nacional de Protección de Datos Personales ha encarado, junto con las provincias argentinas, una acción dinámica para promocionar e implementar el efectivo cumplimiento de la protección de los datos personales.

Para cumplir con los objetivos, se ha puesto en marcha el Registro Nacional de Bases de Datos implementado a partir de 2005 inscribiendo en una primera etapa las bases de datos del sector privado y a partir de 2006 se ha iniciado el relevamiento e inscripción de las bases de datos públicas.

Este evento está dirigido a empresarios, ingenieros, abogados y todos aquellos profesionales que deseen actualizarse en la protección de datos personales, en el ámbito nacional e internacional.


Ley de Datos Personales de Uruguay (2004 – derogada)

Posted: junio 29th, 2006 | Author: | Filed under: General, Normas, Uruguay | No Comments »

DEROGADA POR LEY APROBADA EN AÑO 2008

LEGISLACION – URUGUAY -“ Protección de datos
24/09/04 -“ SE DICTAN NORMAS PARA LA PROTECCIÓN DE DATOS PERSONALES A SER UTILIZADOS EN INFORMES COMERCIALES, arthritis Y SE REGULA LA ACCIÓN DE “HABEAS DATA”. LEY N* ° 17.8

Read the rest of this entry »


* ¿Quo vadis? Iberoamérica fija un rumbo en protección de datos

Posted: junio 29th, 2006 | Author: | Filed under: América Latina, Doctrina, General | No Comments »

** ¿Quo vadis? Iberoamérica fija un rumbo en protección de datos.*
_por Pedro Dubié (miembro del “Foro de Habeas Data”:http://www.habeasdata.org/)_

*Introducción*
Nos centraremos en las naciones latinoamericanas y no tanto en España y Portugal, advice que por varios motivos históricos y polí­ticos gozan de un nivel superior de protección y de polí­ticas más desarrolladas. Utilizaré el término Iberoaméricano, recipe pero no seré tan Ibero.


Para dimensionar el mundo al que nos acercamos he escogido dos datos. En Iberoamérica viven más de 600 millones de personas, ampoule de las cuales unas 546 millones viven en América Central y del Sur y el resto en la pení­nsula ibérica.

El segundo dato es tecnológico: según la “Unión Internacional de Telecomunicaciones”:http://www.itu.int/home/index.html (UTI), en América Central y del Sur, aproximadamente unos 47 millones de habitantes tienen acceso a Internet y el promedio de crecimiento entre el año 2000 y 2004 es de 271%.[1]

Dividiré estas notas en un cuadrante: 1) Tendencias en modelos legislativos de leyes de protección de datos; 2) Contextos históricos distintos entre Europa e Latinoamérica; 3) Argentina, un paí­s con nivel de protección adecuado; 4) El objetivo de una legislación uniforme de protección de datos personales.

*Tendencias en los modelos de leyes*

Para entender como evoluciona la protección de datos en Iberoamérica y tener una visión de conjunto que nos permita descubrir tendencias, he creí­do oportuno comenzar con una buena noticia.

La novedad más importante de la región en este año 2004 es que la “República Oriental del Uruguay ha regulado la acción de Habeas Data”:http://www.habeasdata.org/uruguayleydatospersonales tras siete (7) años de marchas y contramarchas. La ansiada ley contiene además un estatuto de datos personales crediticios que consumió la mitad de otro debate parlamentario en los últimos cuatro (4) años.

-Habeas Data- es la denominación de origen que mejor representa a los temas de protección de datos personales en Iberoamérica, coloquialmente hablando, si bien desde el punto de vista técnico el hábeas data es una garantí­a procesal constitucional [2]. En rigor a la verdad, los estudiosos consideran también al habeas data como un derecho fundamental: unos hablan de un aspecto de la libertad informática y otros de autodeterminación informativa.

Lo cierto es que con una ley procesal, la acción de habeas data, y otra sectorial de datos crediticios, ambas fundidas en un mismo cuerpo, Uruguay viene a confirmar una tendencia en la región que comenzó su andadura en el 2001. Exceptuando “Chile”:http://www.habeasdata.org/ChileLeydePrivacidad y Argentina, los demás paí­ses están sancionando leyes verticales o sectoriales. Esta tendencia comenzó con la ley 27.489 de Perú de fecha junio de 2001 por la que se regula las Centrales Privadas de Información de Riesgos (Cepirs) y de Protección al Titular de la Información.

Y a Perú le sucedieron Paraguay (en Diciembre de 2001), México (en Enero de 2002), y Panamá (mayo de 2002). Mientras todos ellos sancionaron leyes que regulan únicamente los datos crediticios; paralelamente los procesos legislativos más avanzados en los que hay una expectativa de ver sancionadas leyes de tipo horizontal se ven hasta el presente sumidos en un ritmo más lento, como es el caso de Brasil, México y Colombia.

El legislador Iberoaméricano no ha encontrado conveniente sancionar leyes usando el modelo horizontal como la “Directiva Europea 95/46/EC”:http://www.habeasdata.org/DirectivaEuropeaPDP y las leyes de los paí­ses de la Unión Europea. No obstante, deseo anticipar una conclusión de este trabajo: no es que tampoco Iberoamérica esté siguiendo el sistema disperso de leyes verticales de los EEUU para cada sector, proceso legislativo que arrancó en la década de los `70 y que aún persiste.

Lamentablemente los Estados Unidos, tras la caí­da de las Torres Gemelas tiró por la borda varios años de debate en el Congreso que estaban concluyendo en una ley horizontal. Para quienes seguí­amos con interés este proceso legislativo vimos con estupor como de la noche a la mañana, la Patriot Act significó perder mucho.

Si tenemos en cuenta las fuentes citadas en las exposiciones de motivos de los proyectos de ley en Iberoamérica y los discursos de los legisladores a partir de la década de los * ´90; si además comparamos los conceptos fundamentales de los cuales pende el sistema de protección de datos, derechos, obligaciones y sujetos, autoridad y sanciones, podemos afirmar que los legisladores Iberoaméricanos tienen un meridiano conocimiento respecto de la evolución del derecho fundamental de la protección de datos personales.

Todos citan el Convenio 108 del Consejo de Europa de 1981, todos comentan el extenso y ejemplar proceso de standardización legislativo en la “Unión Europea a partir de la Directiva”:http://www.habeasdata.org/DirectivaEuropeaPDP, la mayorí­a tienen en cuenta la Ley Orgánica de Protección de Datos de España (la antigua de 1992 y la nueva LOPD de 1999); y son conscientes que las primeras leyes en la región son “la ley Chilena de 1999″:http://www.habeasdata.org/ChileLeydePrivacidad y la ley Argentina de 2001; pero a la hora de decidir uno u otro modelo se inclinan por una ley sectorial, que sólo resuelve el problema que más le preocupa, y que hasta el momento es el de los datos comerciales o crediticios.

En los últimos años se han incrementado las iniciativas legislativas que regulan el spam y otras categorí­a de datos, y nos encontramos en pleno auge del debate intelectual.

Podrí­amos preguntarnos si no estamos asistiendo ante una práctica legislativa de mencionar antecedentes legislativos en forma mecánica sin entender ni considerar en profundidad el momento histórico que transitaron otros paí­ses desde fines de la década de los años sesenta. Sin dudas podemos afirmar que no se sienten responsables o partí­cipes de alcanzar una ley con efectos transfronterizos y de protección asimilable al de otros paí­ses del mundo.

Es verdad que muchas veces el legislador se ve superado en su capacidad de comprender el fenómeno tecnológico, y por lo tanto le es difí­cil comprender la potencialidad dañosa de vivir en una sociedad desprotegida. Además, en cuanto advierte que el proyecto de ley despierta el interés de numerosos sectores, tanto de la Administración como de varios sectores de la economí­a, como la banca, el marketing comercial, el marketing para medicamentos y el comercio en general, el efecto inmediato es una ralentización del proceso legislativo.

Finalmente, el análisis de la técnica legislativa nos demuestra que a pesar que el legislador rechaza la complejidad que supone escuchar a tantos lobbistas del sector público y privado, no deja de considerar la mejor doctrina y práctica legal europea y la instrumenta sólo para resolver un problema de alta sensibilidad social, cual es la información crediticia.

*Contextos históricos distintos entre Europa y Latinoamérica*

Entre las causas que aletargaron el desarrollo de los procesos legislativos en Iberoamérica, en comparación con Europa y Estados Unidos, desearí­a destacar dos: (i) el bajo nivel de desarrollo tecnológico en la década de los años setenta; y (ii) los gobiernos totalitarios que reinaban a principios de la década del ochenta.

Mientras las naciones Iberoaméricanas no se desarrollaron tecnológicamente, no invertí­an en el bases de datos, y por lo tanto no apareció la amenaza a los datos personales. Las clásicas normas que protegí­an el derecho a la intimidad, y la acción de amparo, de alguna forma dieron una respuesta, si bien rudimentaria, pero respuesta al fin.

Pero además era impensable que las naciones Iberoaméricanas bajo gobiernos totalitarios o de facto en los años -™70 y -˜80, estuvieran dispuestas a contagiarse con leyes que se inspiraran en el Convenio 108 de 1981. Eran tiempos difí­ciles donde estaba en juego antes que nada el derecho primario a la vida y libertad fí­sica, y en consecuencia no habí­a espacio polí­tico para desarrollar una sensibilidad hacia un derecho de tercera generación como el derecho a la protección de datos personales.

Y este aspecto histórico se puede ver plasmado en la reciente ley uruguaya. En el artí­culo 2 se puede leer: -Se exceptúan de esta ley, el tratamiento de datos que no sean de carácter comercial como por ejemplo: a) datos de carácter personal que se originen en el ejercicio de las libertades de emitir opinión y de informar… y b) datos sensibles sobre la privacidad de las personas, entendiéndose por éstos, aquellos datos referentes al origen racial y étnico de las personas, así­ como sus preferencias polí­ticas, convicciones religiosas, filosóficas o morales, afiliación sindical…-.

Una de las razones más poderosas que lentificó el proceso legislativo en Uruguay fue el miedo que se suscitaba en la clase dirigente de que el habeas data fuera usado por los ciudadanos para conocer el paradero de familiares desaparecidos en los momentos más oscuros de la represión. Y no solamente el paradero, sino que el habeas data fuera usado para recabar del Estado todo tipo de información personal acerca de las convicciones polí­ticas de los ciudadanos que en el pasado enfrentó a la sociedad.

El miedo a que se volvieran a abrir viejas heridas, fue suficiente para que el legislador uruguayo no garantizara el derecho de acceso, rectificación y supresión a bases de datos públicas en el tipo de datos antes mencionado. Y de hecho, del otro lado del Rí­o de la Plata, en Buenos Aires, Argentina, el leading case en habeas data de la Corte Suprema de Justicia fue usado para averiguar antecedentes de desaparecidos. En 1998, en el “caso Urteaga”:http://www.habeasdata.org/Urteaga, se permite a un hermano de un desaparecido a recabar del Estado toda información relativa a la desaparición.[3]

Ubicados en la década de los años -˜90, las naciones Iberoaméricanas, y en general todas la naciones, se enfrentaron con la explosión del fenómeno de Internet. Ya el problema no eran las megabases de datos en poder del Estado y de algunos privados, sino que el acceso masivo a los ordenadores personales reverdeció toda la problemática de los datos personales. Apareció en forma ní­tida una nueva amenaza no ya a la intimidad, sino a la Privacidad.

Además, la consolidación de la democracia atrajo a la región un mercado de capitales sin precedentes. También el crédito al consumo se masificó y con ello las bases de datos personales crediticios cobraron un auge importantí­simo que atrajo la inversión de los principales Credit Bureaus del mundo. El fenómeno tecnológico modificó la realidad y el legislador reguló las consecuencias sociales que producí­an los servicios públicos y privados de información crediticia.

Es por ello que cuando nos proponemos realizar un diagnóstico acerca del rumbo que ha tomado la región en materia de protección de datos, y tratamos de establecer unas expectativas, es muy posible que nos puedan surgir conclusiones preliminares erróneas.

Una primera conclusión es pensar que Iberoamérica está atrasada respecto de Europa. No cabe duda que Europa está por delante y soy un admirador del proceso de uniformidad legislativo liderado por Bruselas, pero a juzgar por la técnica legislativa y el marco histórico dirí­a que Iberomérica está progresando desde una situación común diferente.

Una posible conclusión errónea es afirmar que el legislador Iberoaméricano no llega a comprender la gravedad y necesidad de proteger este nuevo derecho fundamental de la protección de datos.

Y es justamente todo lo contrario. La regulación de los datos comerciales y crediticios en los paí­ses mencionados ut supra supera en calidad a varias regulaciones europeas y al pensamiento del Grupo de Trabajo del art. 29[4], y en la actualidad no hay leyes más ecuánimes que las Iberoaméricanas en un contexto de derecho comparado.

El problema más acuciante, cual es el derecho al olvido, esto es el tiempo que deben permanecer los datos crediticios en una base de datos, más el problema inherente a la información comercial, cual es su rápida desactualización, está encontrando soluciones muy ingeniosas en varias naciones iberoamericanas que logran garantizar un óptimo equilibrio entre el derecho a la privacidad y el derecho a la información.

La calidad de varias de estas leyes sectoriales es muy similar a la leyes nacionales europeas. Se asemeja a una Directiva traspuesta sólo en una categorí­a de datos: los comerciales.

Y aquí­ es donde se demuestra que el legislador y el juez latinoamericano son hombres con cultura en privacidad, porque tanto en la reciente ley uruguaya como en los demás antecedentes legislativos y jurisprudenciales se afirma que los derechos de los titulares son derechos fundamentales. Antes que los legisladores, fueron los jueces que resolviendo acciones de habeas data han sabido estar a tono con el pulso de aquellos paí­ses que sin dudas están varios años por delante en capacidad para proteger la globalidad de los datos personales en un mundo global, si se me permite jugar con las palabras.

Este creo que es el legado de Iberoamérica al resto de las naciones que están preocupadas por proteger la privacidad, y nuestra contribución a lo mucho que recibimos de Europa.

Ahora bien, desde el análisis de la protección adecuada, la matriz jurí­dica de estas leyes sectoriales es sin duda europea. La sensibilidad de cómo el legislador reguló estos datos en los paí­ses que han dictado esa norma (Perú, México, Panamá, “Chile”:http://www.habeasdata.org/ChileLeydePrivacidad y Argentina) son una prueba de que se ha aprovechado de lo mejor del derecho comparado.

Personalmente creo que uno de los errores es medir el proceso Iberoaméricano con el proceso que vive la Unión Europea, su Directiva. No cabe duda que vemos en la adecuación un premio ejemplar al que todos deberí­amos aspirar.

Despejando a Chile y Argentina, la pregunta equivocada serí­a: * ¿cuántas y cuales leyes sectoriales debemos sancionar, para que al igual que los Estados Unidos, podamos aspirar a un tratado de Safe Harbor? Si proyectamos Iberoamérica en esta perspectiva nos dará como resultado una brecha cultural, que si bien existe, no es tan extensa como parece.

Personalmente, estoy convencido que los antecedentes de leyes de protección de datos crediticios, toda vez que tienen en cuenta el modelo europeo, son el antecedente más alentador hacia una uniformidad legislativa y no es el comienzo de una dispersión y complejidad de leyes verticales o sectoriales. Pero hay que trabajar mucho para concienciar que hay que quebrar esta inercia.

*Argentina: un paí­s con nivel de protección adecuado*

La Argentina sancionó su ley horizontal de protección de datos en el año 2000, y un año más tarde promulgaba su decreto reglamentario.

En contexto que venimos trazando, en junio de 2003, “la Argentina alcanzó la declaración de paí­s con nivel de protección adecuado por parte de la Unión Europea”:http://www.habeasdata.org/AdecuacionArgentina. Y es el único que ostenta esa calificación. El Grupo de Trabajo del art. 29 de la Directiva Europea coronaba un largo e intenso proceso legislativo[5].

El desafí­o de encarnar una nueva función en el Estado y en la sociedad no es fácil y nos llevará varios años. Un contexto polí­tico adverso dominado por una fuerte devaluación monetaria, que desencadenó una profunda crisis económica a fines de 2001, impactó negativamente en las partidas presupuestarias que necesitaba la nueva dirección para ponerse en funcionamiento. No obstante, la fuerza del proceso legislativo propulsado por las autoridades, secundado por algunos sectores privados y enriquecido por un importante grupo intelectual, antes de concluir con la sanción de la ley, continuó y la actividad se trasladó a la nueva autoridad.

En Septiembre de 2002, se designa el “primer Director Nacional de Protección de Datos Personales”:http://www.jus.gov.ar/dnpdpnew/index.html (DNPDP) y a su vez la primera autoridad independiente en Latinoamérica. La estrategia de la polí­tica argentina sigue el norte establecido por sus homólogos. Además de la ley y un importante decreto reglamentario, tres disposiciones sostienen la estrategia de dirección:

-¢ Clasificación de infracciones y la graduación de las sanciones” (Disposicion 1/2003 BO 30/06/2003), “norma actualmente modificada por Disp. 7/2005″:http://www.habeasdata.org/sanciones.

-¢ El “Registro Nacional de Bases de Datos (Texto Infoleg)”:http://infoleg.mecon.gov.ar/infolegInternet/anexos/90000-94999/90557/norma.htm (Disposición 2/2003 BO 27/11/2003).

-¢ El “primer censo nacional de archivos, registros, bases o bancos de datos privados con carácter obligatorio”:http://infoleg.mecon.gov.ar/infolegInternet/anexos/90000-94999/93025/norma.htm (Disposición 1/2004 BO 26/02/2004)

El Censo Nacional ha resultado un éxito si tenemos en cuenta los pocos sectores privados que participaron del proceso legislativo. “Más de 6.000 bases de datos se han inscripto”:http://www.jus.gov.ar/dnpdpnew/bases_privadas.html y serán el campo de experimentación que puede convertirse en el semillero de prácticas ejemplares para el resto de empresas cuyas bases de datos excede el uso interno o personal. Con el Censo se busca -conocer la composición cualitativa y sectorial de los actores que desarrollan el tratamiento de datos personales-. Además es una base concreta donde se puede y se debe ejercer la actividad de contralor.

En los últimos dos años se han iniciado en Argentina más de 300 expedientes investigando supuestas violaciones a la ley 25.326 y se han emitido más de 50 Dictámenes consultivos, con lo que paso a paso se va creando un cuerpo de doctrina invalorable que deberí­a imprimir mayor velocidad a la actividad administrativa en los próximos años.

Dos provincias argentinas, de las 22 que tiene el estado federal, ha adoptado la “ley nacional de protección de datos 25.326″:http://www.habeasdata.org/ley25326 (Neuquen y Entre Rí­os) comenzando de esta forma a satisfacerse una necesidad que habí­a remarcado Bruselas en el Dictamen previo a la declaración de adecuación. Esto es fruto de la Red Argentina de Protección de Datos Personales que consiste en proponer un sistema de estructuras administrativas provinciales para asegurar la protección de los datos personales en todo el territorio Nacional. Cada estructura se desempeñará como nodo de Red independiente y serán creadas según el criterio de cada provincia, trabajando en conjunto con la Dirección Nacional de Protección de Datos Personales.

Integrante además de la “Red Iberoaméricana de Protección de Datos”:https://www.agpd.es/index.php?idSeccion=349 y de otros foros, Argentina trata de fomentar los beneficios de legislar entre los paí­ses vecinos, sabiendo que la uniformidad legislativa es la solución mí­nima y necesaria en un mundo globalizado donde no existen fronteras para el tráfico de datos personales.

Un noticia trascendente será la finalización de la implementación de las primeras medidas de seguridad al sector de las empresas de marketing para medicamentos. Un sector clave donde circulan millones de datos sensibles está por alcanzar una regulación uniforme con la colaboración de la cámara que representa a las empresas.

Otra práctica anterior a la ley y que ahora continúa con más eficiencia en la atención al ciudadano es el trabajo conjunto de la “Dirección de Protección de Datos Personales”:http://www.jus.gov.ar/dnpdpnew/index.html con las oficinas gubernamentales de atención a los derechos del Consumidor, tanto a nivel nacional (Buenos Aires) como en la provincias. Ello permite atender con agilidad, rapidez y bajos costos los problemas entre ciudadanos y empresas responsables de tratamiento de datos, especialmente los suscitados con los datos crediticios.

La reciente (2004) homologación del Código de Conducta de la Asociación de Marketing Directo e Interactivo de la Argentina no es una noticia menor. No se trata de un mero acto facultativo que la ley da al sector, sino no más bien el fruto del compromiso de la asociación más importante de marketing directo para con el cumplimiento de la ley.

Y la trascendencia de la noticia se explica justamente en el Decreto Reglamentario 1558/2001. Cuando se reglamenta el artí­culo 27, relativo a los archivos, registros o bancos de datos con fines de publicidad, el párrafo cuarto de la reglamentación establece que para garantizar el derecho de información a los ciudadanos, sólo se inscribirán en el registro de bases de datos, las cámaras, asociaciones y colegios profesionales del sector del marketing que dispongan de un código de conducta homologado por la autoridad. Al inscribirse la cámara, asociación o colegio deberán acompañar una nómina de sus asociados.[6]

Por ello, deseo volver a relacionar esta noticia con la declaración de nivel de protección adecuado de Argentina. Podemos afirmar que los éxitos y aciertos han sucedido gracias a un intenso trabajo que vivió la sociedad antes de la sanción de la ley y a la sensibilidad de España, a que estaremos siempre agradecidos.

* ¿Cuales son las claves de Argentina que modificó su Constitución en 1994, incluyó una cláusula de habeas data (ver art. 43 tercer párrafo) y diez años más tarde cuenta con una ley de protección de datos, una extensa jurisprudencia y con sectores públicos y privados comprometidos con la aplicación de la ley?.

Una conducta social responsable, un objetivo común consensuado y un debate intenso de tres sectores generalmente divorciados: las autoridades, las universidades y las empresas.

*El objetivo de una legislación uniforme para Iberoamérica*

Como muchos de Uds. saben, la Agencia de Protección de Datos de España está cumpliendo un rol vital en Iberoamérica para alcanzar una legislación que comulgue con el modelo europeo.

De conformidad con la “Declaración de La Antigua (Guatemala) con motivo del II Encuentro Iberoaméricano de Protección de Datos Personales”:http://www.habeasdata.org/Antigua, del 6 de junio de 2003, las naciones Iberoaméricanas están trabajando bajo principios de cooperación y han delegado la secretarí­a en España.

Se pone de manifiesto que no obstante los avances que en la protección de datos se han realizado en Iberoamérica, continúan produciéndose situaciones que impiden o dificultan el ejercicio efectivo de tal derecho. Es necesario insistir en que las leyes nacionales deberí­an tomar en consideración los principios esenciales de protección de datos reconocidos en los instrumentos internacionales.

De allí­ que todos los esfuerzos que pueda hacer la Red Iberoaméricana en divulgar las prácticas de protección de datos sigue siendo el mejor vehí­culo para debatir y concienciar en el único objetivo que debe ser su desvelo: la regulación bajo imperio de una autoridad independiente que tenga competencia en todas las categorí­as de datos personales.

Y esto hay que decirlo así­ de claro. Y este es el mensaje que debe recibir el legislador.

Pero al mismo tiempo es necesario decir lo siguiente. Si hemos afirmado que el desarrollo tecnológico precede a la regulación, que existe una intima relación de causalidad en el incremento de las nuevas tecnologí­as y el aumento de la amenaza a la privacidad, debemos ser pacientes y permitir que el proceso de maduración se complete. No se puede pretender acelerar etapas, aunque deberemos ser muy exigentes que las polí­ticas transformen la realidad sin pausa.

Debemos recordar la lección de la historia: entre la creación de la primera autoridad alemana en el Lí¤nd de Hesse y el Convenio 108 del Consejo de Europa transcurrieron 11 años y entre el Bayerl Report y la “Directiva 95/46/EC”:http://www.habeasdata.org/DirectivaEuropeaPDP transcurrieron 16 años.

Veintiocho (28) paí­ses suscribieron el Convenio 108 en Enero de 1981 y entró en efecto en 1985 con la suscripción del quinto paí­s. Actualmente 38 paí­ses han suscripto el convenio, pero en sus veintitrés años de existencia la incorporación al derecho interno ha sido gradual. Y esto ha sido un éxito!

En los primera década 9 fueron los paí­ses que cumplieron con el tratado. En los noventa fueron 11 paí­ses y en lo que va del año 2000 en adelante otros 11 nuevos paí­ses cuentan con leyes de protección de datos. A su ritmo, cuanto bien ha hecho el Convenio 108.

En Iberoamérica, el control jurisdiccional a través de la acción de habeas data y de la acción de amparo ha sido el motor del progreso. Si consideramos el proceso de reforma de las constituciones latinoamericanas, con la inclusión de fórmulas de habeas data o declaraciones de protección de la vida privada, la aparición de las primeras leyes y la jurisprudencia más temprana, nos damos cuenta que también ha transcurrido entre diez y quince años según los casos. Si a ello le agregamos una producción legislativa en expansión, podemos darnos por satisfechos que nos encontramos dentro de parámetros normales de crecimiento desde un punto de vista comparativo.

[1] Ver “www.itu.int”:http://www.itu.int/home/index.html

[2] Ver discusión doctrinaria acerca de la naturaleza jurí­dica del hábeas data en la obra de Oscar Puccinelli, “El Habeas Data en Indoiberoamérica”:http://www.habeasdata.org/OscarLibroTemis, Editorial Temis, 1999, pag. 103.

[3] “Urteaga, Facundo c/ Estado Mayor Conjunto de las Fuerzas Armadas”:http://www.habeasdata.org/Urteaga, C.S., 15/10/1998, comentado por Alberto B. Bianchi, -El habeas data como remedio de protección del derecho a la información objetiva en un valioso fallo de la Corte Suprema-, La Ley, Suplemento de Jurisprudencia de Derecho Administrativo (27/12/98).

[4] Ver Comisión Europea, DG Mercado Interior, Dirección de Libre Circulación de la Información y Protección de Datos; Grupo de trabajo del artí­culo 29 de la Directiva 95/46/CE, WP 65 “Documento de trabajo sobre las listas negras (Archivo PDF externo)”:http://ec.europa.eu/justice_home/fsj/privacy/docs/wpdocs/2002/wp65_es.pdf, Adoptado el 3 de octubre de 2002, 11118/02/ES/Final.

[5] El “GT29 se pronunció favorablemente en relación con el nivel de protección otorgado por la Ley sobre protección de datos personales de Argentina”:http://www.habeasdata.org/AdecuacionArgentina, de 4 de octubre de 2000 (WP 63). La Agencia española ha colaborado intensivamente con el Ministerio de Justicia de aquél paí­s prestando su asesoramiento, apoyo y experiencia en la elaboración de dicha norma legal. El instrumento por el que la Comisión Europea, una vez consultado el grupo gubernamental del Protección de Datos y el Parlamento Europeo, declara la adecuación es laDecisión de 30 de junio de 2003 , publicada en el Oficial de del 5 de julio de 2003.El Gobierno de la República Argentina solicitó a la Comisión Europea que determinara si dicho paí­s garantiza un nivel de protección adecuado con arreglo a lo dispuesto en el “artí­culo 25 de la Directiva 95/46 , de Protección de Datos”:http://www.habeasdata.org/DirectivaEuropeaPDP.

[6] Oscar Puccinelli, Protección de datos de carater personal, Editorial Astrea, 2004, página 398 y ss.
***


Directiva Europea de Protección de Datos Personales 95/46/CE

Posted: junio 14th, 2006 | Author: | Filed under: General, Normas, Unión Europea | No Comments »

DIRECTIVA 95/46/CE DEL PARLAMENTO EUROPEO Y DEL CONSEJO de 24 de octubre de 1995 relativa a la protección de las personas fí­sicas en lo que respecta al tratamiento de datos personales y a la libre circulación de estos datos

EL PARLAMENTO EUROPEO Y EL CONSEJO DE LA UNIÓN EUROPEA, doctor

Visto el Tratado consitutivo de la Comunidad Europea, y, en particular, su artí­culo 100 A,

Vista la propuesta de la Comisión (1),

Visto el dictamen del Comité Económico y Social (2),

De conformidad con el procedimiento establecido en el artí­culo 189 B del Tratado (3),

(1) Considerando que los objetivos de la Comunidad definidos en el Tratado, tal y como quedó modificado por el Tratado de la Unión Europea, consisten en lograr una unión cada vez más estrecha entre los pueblos europeos, establecer relaciones más estrechas entre los Estados miembros de la Comunidad, asegurar, mediante una acción común, el progreso económico y social, eliminando las barreras que dividen Europa, fementar la continua mejora de las condiciones de vida de sus pueblos, preservar y consolidar la paz y la libertad y promover la democracia, basándose en los derechos fundamentales reconocidos en las constituciones y leyes de los Estados miembros y en el Convenio Europeo para la Protección de los Derechos Humanos y de las Libertades Fundamentales;

(2) Considerando que los sistemas de tratamiento de datos están al servicio del hombre; que deben, cualquiera que sea la nacionalidad o la residencia de las personas fí­sicas, respetar las libertades y derechos fundamentales de las personas fí­sicas y, en particular, la intimidad, y contribuir al progreso económico y social, al desarrollo de los intercambios, así­ como al bienestar de los indiviuos;

(3) Considerando que el establecimiento y funcionamiento del mercado interior, dentro del cual está garantizada, con arreglo al artí­culo 7 A del Tratado, la libre circulación de mercancí­as, personas, servicios y capitales, hacen necesaria no sólo la libre circulación de datos personales de un Estado miembro a otro, sino también la protección de los derechos fundamentales de las personas;

(4) Considerando que se recurre cada vez más en la Comunidad al tratamiento de datos personales en los diferentes sectores de actividad económica y social; que el avance de las tecnologí­as de la información facilita considerablemente el tratamiento y el intercambio de dichos datos;

(5) Considerando que la integración económica y social resultante del establecimiento y funcionamiento del mercado interior, definido en el artí­culo 7 A del Tratado, va a implicar necesariamente un aumento notable de los flujos transfronterizos de datos personales entre todos los agentes de la vida económica y social de los Estados miembros, ya se trate de agentes públicos o privados; que el intercambio de datos personales entre empresas establecidas en los diferentes Estados miembros experimentará un desarrollo; que las administraciones nacionales de los diferentes Estados miembros, en aplicación del Derecho comunitario, están destinadas a colaborar y a intercambiar datos personales a fin de cumplir su cometido o ejercer funciones por cuenta de las administraciones de otros Estados miembros, en el marco del espacio sin fronteras que constituye el mercado interior;

(6) Considerando, por lo demás, que el fortalecimiento de la cooperación cientí­fica y técnica, así­ como el establecimiento coordinado de nuevas redes de telcomunicaciones en la Comunidad exigen y facilitan la circulación transfronteriza de datos personales;

(7) Considerando que las diferencias entre los niveles de protección de los derechos y libertades de las personas y, en particular, de la intimidad, garantizados en los Estados miembros por lo que respecta al tratamiento de datos personales, pueden impedir la transmisión de dichos datos del territorio de un Estado miembro al de otro; que, por lo tanto, estas diferencias pueden constituir un obstáculo para el ejercicio de una serie de actividades económicas a escala comunitaria, falsear la competencia e impedir que las administraciones cumplan los cometidos que les incumben en virtud del Derecho comunitario; que estas diferencias en los niveles de protección se deben a la disparidad existente entre las disposiciones legales, reglamentarias y administrativas de los Estados miembros;

(8) Considerando que, para eliminar los obstáculos a la circulación de datos personales, el nivel de protección de los derechos y libertades de las personas, por lo que se refiere al tratamiento de dichos datos, debe ser equivalente en todos los Estados miembros; que ese objetivo, esencial para el mercado interior, no puede lograrse mediante la mera actuación de los Estados miembros, teniendo en cuenta, en particular, las grandes diferencias existentes en la actualidad entre las legislaciones nacionales aplicables en la materia y la necesidad de coordinar las legislaciones de los Estados miembros para que el flujo transfronterizo de datos personales sea regulado de forma coherente y de conformidad con el objetivo del mercado interior definido en el artí­culo 7 A del Tratado; que, por tanto, es necesario que la Comunidad intervenga para aproximar las legislaciones;

(9) Considerando que, a causa de la protección equivalente que resulta de la aproximación de las legislaciones nacionales, los Estados miembros ya no podrán obstaculizar la libre circulación entre ellos de datos personales por motivos de protección de los derechos y libertades de las personas fí­sicas, y, en particular, del derecho a la intimidad; que los Estados miembros dispondrán de un margen de maniobra del cual podrán servirse, en el contexto de la aplicación de la presente Directiva, los interlocutores económicos y sociales; que los Estados miembros podrán, por lo tanto, precisar en su derecho nacional las condiciones generales de licitud del tratamiento de datos; que, al actuar así­, los Estados miembros procurarán mejorar la protección que proporciona su legislación en la actualidad; que, dentro de los lí­mites de dicho margen de maniobra y de conformidad con el Derecho comunitario, podrán surgir disparidades en la aplicación de la presente Directiva, y que ello podrá tener repercusiones en la circulación de datos tanto en el interior de un Estado miembro como en la Comunidad;

(10) Considerando que las legislaciones nacionales relativas al tratamiento de datos personales tienen por objeto garantizar el respeto de los derechos y libertades fundamentales, particularmente del derecho al respeto de la vida privada reconocido en el artí­culo 8 del Convenio Europeo para la Protección de los Derechos Humanos y de las Libertades Fundamentales, así­ como en los principios generales del Derecho comunitario; que, por lo tanto, la aproximación de dichas legislaciones no debe conducir a una disminución de la protección que garantizan sino que, por el contratrio, debe tener por objeto asegurar un alto nivel de protección dentro de la Comunidad;

(11) Considerando que los principios de la protección de los derechos y libertades de las personas y, en particular, del respeto de la intimidad, contenidos en la presente Directiva, precisan y amplí­an los del Convenio de 28 de enero de 1981 del Consejo de Europa para la protección de las personas en lo que respecta al tratamiento automatizado de los datos personales;

(12) Considerando que los principios de la protección deben aplicarse a todos los tratamientos de datos personales cuando las actividades del responsable del tratamiento entren en el ámbito de aplicación del Derecho comunitario; que debe excluirse el tratamiento de datos efectuado por una persona fí­sica en el ejercicio de actividades exclusivamente personales o domésticas, como la correspondencia y la llevanza de un repertorio de direcciones;

(13) Considerando que las actividades a que se refieren los tí­tulos V y VI del Tratado de la Unión Europea relativos a la seguridad pública, la defensa, la seguridad del Estado y las actividades del Estado en el ámbito penal no están comprendidas en el ámbito de aplicación del Derecho comunitario, sin perjuicio de las obligaciones que incumben a los Estados miembros con arreglo al apartado 2 del artí­culo 56 y a los artí­culos 57 y 100 A del Tratado; que el tratamiento de los datos de carácter personal que sea necesario para la salvaguardia del bienestar económico del Estado no está comprendido en el ámbito de aplicación de la presente Directiva en los casos en que dicho tratamiento esté relacionado con la seguridad del Estado;

(14) Considerando que, habida cuenta de la importancia que, en el marco de la sociedad de la información, reviste el actual desarrollo de las técnicas para captar, transmitir, manejar, registrar, conservar o comunicar los datos relativos a las personas fí­sicas constituidos por sonido e imagen, la presente Directiva habrá de aplicarse a los tratamientos que afectan a dichos datos;

(15) Considerando que los tratamientos que afectan a dichos datos sólo quedan amparados por la presente Directiva cuando están automatizados o cuando los datos a que se refieren se encuentran contenidos o se destinan a encontrarse contenidos en un archivo estructurado según criterios especí­ficos relativos a las pesonas, a fin de que se pueda acceder fácilmente a los datos de carácter personal de que se trata;

(16) Considerando que los tratamientos de datos constituidos por sonido e imagen, como los de la vigilancia por videocámara, no están comprendidos en el ámbito de aplicación de la presente Directiva cuando se aplican con fines de seguridad pública, defensa, seguridad del Estado o para el ejercicio de las actividades del Estado relacionadas con ámbitos del derecho penal o para el ejercicio de otras actividades que no están comprendidos en el ámbito de aplicación del Derecho comunitario;

(17) Considerando que en lo que respecta al tratamiento del sonido y de la imagen aplicados con fines periodí­sticos o de expresión literaria o artí­stica, en particular en el sector audiovisual, los principios de la Directiva se aplican de forma restringida según lo dispuesto en al artí­culo 9;

(18) Considerando que, para evitar que una persona sea excluida de la protección garantizada por la presente Directiva, es necesario que todo tratamiento de datos personales efectuado en la Comunidad respete la legislación de uno de sus Estados miembros; que, a este respecto, resulta conveniente someter el tratamiento de datos efectuados por cualquier persona que actúe bajo la autoridad del responsable del tratamiento establecido en un Estado miembro a la aplicación de la legislación de tal Estado;

(19) Considerando que el establecimiento en el territorio de un Estado miembro implica el ejercicio efectivo y real de una actividad mediante una instalación estable; que la forma jurí­dica de dicho establecimiento, sea una simple sucursal o una empresa filial con personalidad jurí­dica, no es un factor determinante al respecto; que cuando un mismo responsable esté establecido en el territorio de varios Estados miembros, en particular por medio de una empresa filial, debe garantizar, en particular para evitar que se eluda la normativa aplicable, que cada uno de los establecimientos cumpla las obligaciones impuestas por el Derecho nacional aplicable a estas actividades;

(20) Considerando que el hecho de que el responsable del tratamiento de datos esté establecido en un paí­s tercero no debe obstaculizar la protección de las personas contemplada en la presente Directiva; que en estos casos el tratamiento de datos debe regirse por la legislación del Estado miembro en el que se ubiquen los medios utilizados y deben adoptarse garantí­as para que se respeten en la práctica los derechos y obligaciones contempladas en la presente Directiva;

(21) Considerando que la presente Directiva no afecta a las normas de territorialidad aplicables en materia penal;

(22) Considerando que los Estados miembros precisarán en su legislación o en la aplicación de las disposiciones adoptadas en virtud de la presente Directiva las condiciones generales de licitud del tratamiento de datos; que, en particular, el artí­culo 5 en relación con los artí­culos 7 y 8, ofrece a los Estados miembros la posibilidad de prever, independientemente de las normas generales, condiciones especiales de tratamiento de datos en sectores especí­ficos, así­ como para las diversas categorí­as de datos contempladas en el artí­culo 8;

(23) Considerando que los Estados miembros están facultados para garantizar la protección de las personas tanto mediante una ley general relativa a la protección de las personas respecto del tratamiento de los datos de carácter personal como mediante leyes sectoriales, como las relativas a los institutos estadí­sticos;

(24) Considerando que las legislaciones relativas a la protección de las personas jurí­dicas respecto del tratamiento de los datos que las conciernan no son objeto de la presente Directiva;

(25) Considerando que los principios de la protección tienen su expresión, por una parte, en las distintas obligaciones que incumben a las personas, autoridades públicas, empresas, agencias u otros organismos que efectúen tratamientos- obligaciones relativas, en particular, a la calidad de los datos, la seguridad técnica, la notificación a las autoridades de control y las circunstancias en las que se puede efectuar el tratamiento- y, por otra parte, en los derechos otorgados a las personas cuyos datos sean objeto de tratamiento de ser informadas acerca de dicho tratamiento, de poder acceder a los datos, de poder solicitar su rectificación o incluso de oponerse a su tratamiento en determinadas circunstancias;

(26) Considerando que los principios de la protección deberán aplicarse a cualquier información relativa a una persona identificada o identificable; que, para determinar si una persona es identificable, hay que considerar el conjunto de los medios que puedan ser razonablemente utilizados por el responsable del tratamiento o por cualquier otra persona, para identificar a dicha persona; que los principios de la protección no se aplicarán a aquellos datos hechos anónimos de manera tal que ya no sea posible identificar al interesado; que los códigos de conducta con arreglo al artí­culo 27 pueden constituir un elemento útil para proporcionar indicaciones sobre los medios gracias a los cuales los datos pueden hacerse anónimos y conservarse de forma tal que impida identificar al interesado;

(27) Considerando que la protección de las personas debe aplicarse tanto al tratamiento automático de datos como a su tratamiento manual; que el alcance de esta protección no debe depender, en efecto, de las técnicas utilizadas, pues la contrario darí­a lugar a riesgos graves de elusión; que, no obstante, por lo que respecta al tratamiento manual, la presente Directiva sólo abarca los ficheros, y no se aplica a las carpetas que no están estructuradas; que, en particular, el contenido de un fichero debe estructurarse conforme a criterios especí­ficos relativos a las personas, que permitan acceder fácilmente a los datos personales; que, de conformidad con la definición que recoge la letra c) del artí­culo 2, los distintos criterios que permiten determinar los elementos de un conjunto estructurado de datos de carácter personal y los distintos criterios que regulan el acceso a dicho conjunto de datos pueden ser definidos por cada Estado miembro; que, las carpetas y conjuntos de carpetas, así­ como sus portadas, que no estén estructuradas conforme a criterios especí­ficos no están comprendidas en ningún caso en el ámbito de aplicación de la presente Directiva;

(28) Considerando que todo tratamiento de datos personales debe efectuarse de forma lí­cita y leal con respecto al interesado; que debe referirse, en particular, a datos adecuados, pertinentes y no excesivos en relación con los objetivos perseguidos; que estos objetivos han de ser explí­citos y legí­timos, y deben estar determinados en el momento de obtener los datos; que los objetivos de los tratamientos posteriores a la obtención no pueden ser incompatibles con los objetivos originalmente especificados;

(29) Considerando que el tratamiento ulterior de datos personales, con fines históricos, estadí­sticos o cientí­ficos no debe por lo general considerarse incompatible con los objetivos para los que se recogieron los datos, siempre y cuando los Estados miembros establezcan las garantí­as adecuadas; que dichas garantí­as deberán impedir que dichos datos sean utilizados para tomar medidas o decisiones contra cualquier persona;

(30) Considerando que para ser lí­cito el tratamiento de datos personales debe basarse además en el consentimiento del interesado o ser necesario con vistas a la celebración o ejecución de un contrato que obligue al interesado, o para la observancia de una obligación legal o para el cumplimiento de una misión de interés público o para el ejercicio de la autoridad pública o incluso para la realización de un interés legí­timo de una persona, siempre que no prevalezcan los intereses o los derechos y libertades del interesado; que, en particular, para asegurar el equilibrio de los intereses en juego, garantizando a la vez una competencia efectiva, los Estados miembros pueden precisar las condiciones en las que se podrán utilizar y comunicar a terceros datos de carácter personal, en el desempeño de actividades legí­timas de gestión ordinaria de empresas y otras entidades; que los Estados miembros pueden asimismo establecer previamente las condiciones en que pueden efectuarse comunicaciones de datos personales a terceros con fines de prospección comercial o de prospección realizada por una institución benéfica u otras asociaciones o fundaciones, por ejemplo de carácter polí­tico, dentro del respeto de las disposiciones que permiten a los interesados oponerse, sin alegar los motivos y sin gastos, al tratamiento de los datos que les conciernan;

(31) Considerando que un tratamiento de datos personales debe estimarse lí­cito cuando se efectúa con el fin de proteger un interés esencial para la vida del interesado;

(32) Considerando que corresponde a las legislaciones nacionales determinar si el responsable del tratamiento que tiene conferida una misión de interés público o inherente al ejercicio del poder público, debe ser una administración pública u otra persona de derecho público o privado, como por ejemplo una asociación profesional;

(33) Considerando, por lo demás, que los datos que por su naturaleza puedan atentar contra las libertades fundamentales o la intimidad no deben ser objeto de tratamiento alguno, salvo en caso de que el interesado haya dado su consentimiento explí­cito; que deberán constar de forma explí­cita las excepciones a esta prohibición para necesidades especí­ficas, en particular cuando el tratamiento de dichos datos se realice con fines relacionados con la salud, por parte de personas fí­sicas sometidas a una obligación legal de secreto profesional, o para actividades legí­timas por parte de ciertas asociaciones o fundaciones cuyo objetivo sea hacer posible el ejercicio de libertades fundamentales;

(34) Considerando que también se deberá autorizar a los Estados miembros, cuando esté justificado por razones de interés público importante, a hacer excepciones a la prohibición de tratar categorí­as sensibles de datos en sectores como la salud pública y la protección social, particularmente en lo relativo a la garantí­a de la calidad y la rentabilidad, así­ como los procedimientos utilizados para resolver las reclamaciones de prestaciones y de servicios en el régimen del seguro enfermedad, la investigación cientí­fica y las estadí­sticas públicas; que a ellos corresponde, no obstante, prever las garantí­as apropiadas y especí­ficas a los fines de proteger los derechos fundamentales y la vida privada de las personas;

(35) Considerando, además, que el tratamiento de datos personales por parte de las autoridades públicas con fines, establecidos en el Derecho constitucional o en el Derecho internacional público, de asociaciones religiosas reconocidas oficialmente, se realiza por motivos importantes de interés público;

(36) Considerando que, si en el marco de actividades relacionadas con las elecciones, el funcionamiento del sistema democrático en algunos Estados miembros exige que los partidos polí­ticos recaben datos sobre la ideologí­a polí­tica de los ciudadanos, podrá autorizarse el tratamiento de estos datos por motivos importantes de interés público, siempre que se establezcan las garantí­as adecuadas;

(37) Considerando que para el tratamiento de datos personales con fines periodí­sticos o de expresión artí­stica o literaria, en particular en el sector audiovisual, deben preverse excepciones o restricciones de determinadas disposiciones de la presente Directiva siempre que resulten necesarias para conciliar los derechos fundamentales de la persona con la libertad de expresión y, en particular, la libertad de recibir o cumunicar informaciones, tal y como se garantiza en el artí­culo 10 del Convenio Europeo para la Protección de los Derechos Humanos y de las Libertades Fundamentales; que por lo tanto, para ponderar estos derechos fundamentales, corresponde a los Estados miembros prever las excepciones y las restricciones necesarias en lo relativo a las medidas generales sobre la legalidad del tratamiento de datos, las medidas sobre la transferencia de datos a terceros paí­ses y las competencias de las autoridades de control sin que esto deba inducir, sin embargo, a los Estados miembros a prever excepciones a las medidas que garanticen la seguridad del tratamiento; que, igualmente, deberí­a concederse a la autoridad de control responsable en la materia al menos una serie de competencias a posteriori como por ejemplo publicar periódicamente un informe al respecto o bien iniciar procedimientos legales ante las autoridades judiciales;

(38) Considerando que el tratamiento leal de datos supone que los interesados deben estar en condiciones de conocer la existencia de los tratamientos y, cuando los datos se obtengan de ellos mismos, contar con una información precisa y completa respecto a las circunstancias de dicha obtención;

(39) Considerando que determinados tratamientos se refieren a datos que el responsable no ha recogido directamente del interesado; que, por otra parte, pueden comunicarse legí­timamente datos a un tercero aún cuando dicha comunicación no estuviera prevista en el momento de la recogida de los datos del propio interesado; que, en todos estos supuestos, debe informarse al interesado en el momento del registro de los datos o, a más tardar, al comunicarse los datos por primera vez a un tercero;

(40) Considerando, no obstante, que no es necesario imponer esta obligación si el interesado ya está informado, si el registro o la comunicación están expresamente previstos por la ley o si resulta imposible informarle, o ello implica esfuerzos desproporcionados, como puede ser el caso para tratamientos con fines históricos, estadí­sticos o cientí­ficos; que a este respecto pueden tomarse en consideración el número de interesados, la antigueedad de los datos, y las posibles medidas compensatorias;

(41) Considerando que cualquier persona debe disfrutar del derecho de acceso a los datos que le conciernan y sean objeto de tratamiento, para cerciorarse, en particular, de su exactitud y de la licitud de su tratamiento; que por las mismas razones cualquier persona debe tener además el derecho de conocer la lógica que subyace al tratamiento automatizado de los datos que la conciernan, al menos en el caso de las decisiones automatizadas a que se refiere el apartado 1 del artí­culo 15; que este derecho no debe menoscabar el secreto de los negocios ni la propiedad intelectual y en particular el derecho de autor que proteja el programa informático; que no obstante esto no debe suponer que se deniegue cualquier información al interesado;

(42) Considerando que, en interés del interesado de que se trate y para proteger los derechos y libertades de terceros, los Estados miembros podrán limitar los derechos de acceso y de información; que podrán, por ejemplo, precisar que el acceso a los datos de carácter médico únicamente pueda obtenerse a través de un profesional de la medicina;

(43) Considerando que los Estados miembros podrán imponer restricciones a los derechos de acceso e información y a determinadas obligaciones del responsable del tratamiento, en la medida en que sean estrictamente necesarias para, por ejemplo, salvaguardar la seguridad del Estado, la defensa, la seguridad pública, los intereses económicos o financieros importantes de un Estado miembro o de la Unión, así­ como para realizar investigaciones y entablar procedimientos penales y perseguir violaciones de normas deontológicas en las profesiones reguladas; que conviene enumerar, a efectos de excepciones y limitaciones, las tareas de control, inspección o reglamentación necesarias en los tres últimos sectores mencionados relativos a la seguridad pública, los intereses económicos o financieros y la represión penal; que esta enumeración de tareas relativas a los tres sectores citados no afecta a la legitimidad de las excepciones y restricciones establecidas por razones de seguridad del Estado o de defensa;

(44) Considerando que los Estados miembros podrán verse obligados, en virtud de las disposiciones del Derecho comunitario, a establecer excepciones a las disposiciones de la presente Directiva relativas al derecho de acceso, a la información de personas y a la calidad de los datos para garantizar algunas de las finalidades contempladas más arriba;

(45) Considerando que cuando se pudiera efectuar lí­citamente un tratamiento de datos por razones de interés público o del ejercicio de la autoridad pública, o en interés legí­timo de una persona fí­sica, cualquier persona deberá, sin embargo, tener derecho a oponerse a que los datos que le conciernan sean objeto de un tratamiento, en virtud de motivos fundados y legí­timos relativos a su situación concreta; que los Estados miembros tienen, no obstante, la posibilidad de establecer disposiciones nacionales contrarias;

(46) Considerando que la protección de los derechos y libertades de los interesados en lo que respecta a los tratamientos de datos personales exige la adopción de medidas técnicas y de organización apropiadas, tanto en el momento de la concepción del sistema de tratamiento como en el de la aplicación de los tratamientos mismos, sobre todo con objeto de garantizar la seguridad e impedir, por tanto, todo tratamiento no autorizado; que corresponde a los Estados miembros velar por que los responsables del tratamiento respeten dichas medidas; que esas medidas deberán garantizar un nivel de seguridad adecuado teniendo en cuenta el estado de la técnica y el coste de su aplicación en relación con los riesgos que presente el tratamiento y con la naturaleza de los datos que deban protegerse;

(47) Considerando que cuando un mensaje con datos personales sea transmitido a través de un servicio de telecomunicaciones o de correo eletrónico cuyo único objetivo sea transmitir mensajes de ese tipo, será considerada normalmente responsable del tratamiento de los datos personales presentes en el mensaje aquella persona de quien proceda el mensaje y no la que ofrezca el servicio de transmisión; que, no obstante, las personas que ofrezcan estos servicios normalmente serán consideradas responsables del tratamiento de los datos personales complementarios y necesarios para el funcionamiento del servicio;

(48) Considerando que los procedimientos de notificación a la autoridad de control tienen por objeto asegurar la publicidad de los fines de los tratamientos y de sus principales caracterí­sticas a fin de controlarlos a la luz de las disposiciones nacionales adoptadas en aplicación de la presente Directiva;

(49) Considerando que para evitar trámites administrativos improcedentes, los Estados miembros pueden establecer exenciones o simplificaciones de la notificación para los tratamientos que no atenten contra los derechos y las libertades de los interesados, siempre y cuando sean conformes a un acto adoptado por el Estado miembro en el que se precisen sus lí­mites; que los Estados miembros pueden igualmente disponer la exención o la simplificación cuando un encargado, nombrado por el responsable del tratamiento, se cerciore de que los tratamientos efectuados no pueden atentar contra los derechos y libertades de los interesados; que la persona encargada de la protección de los datos, sea o no empleado del responsable del tratamiento de datos, deberá ejercer sus funciones con total independencia;

(50) Considerando que podrán establecerse exenciones o simplificaciones para los tratamientos cuya única finalidad sea el mantenimiento de registros destinados, de conformidad con el Derecho nacional, a la información del público y que sean accesibles para la consulta del público o de toda persona que justifique un interés legí­timo;

(51) Considerando, no obstante, que el beneficio de la simplificación o de la exención de la obligación de notificación no dispensa al responsable del tratamiento de ninguna de las demás obligaciones derivadas de la presente Directiva;

(52) Considerando que, en este contexto, el control a posteriori por parte de las autoridades competentes debe considerarse, en general, una medida suficiente;

(53) Considerando, no obstante, que determinados tratamientos pueden presentar riesgos particulares desde el punto de vista de los derechos y las libertades de los interesados, ya sea por su naturaleza, su alcance o su finalidad, como los de excluir a los interesados del beneficio de un derecho, de una prestación o de un contrato, o por el uso particular de una tecnologí­a nueva; que es competencia de los Estados miembros, si así­ lo desean, precisar tales riesgos en sus legislaciones;

(54) Considerando que, a la vista de todos los tratamientos llevados a cabo en la sociedad, el número de los que presentan tales riesgos particulares deberí­a ser muy limitado; que los Estados miembros deben prever, para dichos tratamientos, un examen previo a su realización por parte de la autoridad de control o del encargado de la protección de datos en cooperación con aquélla; que, tras dicho control previo, la autoridad de control, en virtud de lo que disponga su Derecho nacional, podrá emitir un dictamen o autorizar el tratamiento de datos; que este examen previo podrá realizarse también en el curso de la elaboración de una medida legislativa aprobada por el Parlamento nacional o de una medida basada en dicha medida legislativa, que defina la naturaleza del tratamiento y precise las garantí­as adecuadas;

(55) Considerando que las legislaciones nacionales deben prever un recurso judical para los casos en los que el responsable del tratamiento de datos no respete los derechos de los interesados; que los daños que pueden sufrir las personas a raí­z de un tratamiento ilí­cito han de ser reparados por el responsable del tratamiento de datos, el cual sólo podrá ser eximido de responsabilidad si demuestra que no le es imputable el hecho perjudicial, principalmente si demuestra la responsabilidad del interesado o un caso de fuerza mayor; que deben imponerse sanciones a toda persona, tanto de derecho privado como de derecho público, que no respete las disposiciones nacionales adoptadas en aplicación de la presente Directiva;

(56) Considerando que los flujos transfronterizos de datos personales son necesarios para la desarrollo del comercio internacional; que la protección de las personas garantizada en la Comunidad por la presente Directiva no se opone a la transferencia de datos personales a terceros paí­ses que garanticen un nivel de protección adecuado; que el carácter adecuado del nivel de protección ofrecido por un paí­s tercero debe apreciarse teniendo en cuenta todas las circunstancias relacionadas con la transferencia o la categorí­a de transferencias;

(57) Considerando, por otra parte, que cuando un paí­s tercero no ofrezca un nivel de protección adecuado debe prohibirse la transferencia al mismo de datos personales;

(58) Considerando que han de establecerse excepciones a esta prohibición en determinadas circunstancias, cuando el interesado haya dado su consentimiento, cuando la transferencia sea necesaria en relación con un contrato o una acción judicial, cuando así­ lo exija la protección de un interés público importante, por ejemplo en casos de transferencia internacional de datos entre las administraciones fiscales o aduaneras o entre los servicios competentes en materia de seguridad social, o cuando la transferencia se haga desde un registro previsto en la legislación con fines de consulta por el público o por personas con un interés legí­timo; que en tal caso dicha transferencia no debe afectar a la totalidad de los datos o las categorí­as de datos que contenga el mencionado registro; que, cuando la finalidad de un registro sea la consulta por parte de personas que tengan un interés legí­timo, la transferencia sólo deberí­a poder efectuarse a petición de dichas personas o cuando éstas sean las destinatarias;

(59) Considerando que pueden adoptarse medidas particulares para paliar la insuficiencia del nivel de protección en un tercer paí­s, en caso de que el responsable del tratamiento ofrezca garantí­as adecuadas; que, por lo demás, deben preverse procedimientos de negociación entre la Comunidad y los paí­ses terceros de que se trate;

(60) Considerando que, en cualquier caso, las transferencias hacia paí­ses terceros sólo podrán efectuarse si se respetan plenamente las disposiciones adoptadas por los Estados miembros en aplicación de la presente Directiva, y, en particular, de su artí­culo 8;

(61) Considerando que los Estados miembros y la Comisión, dentro de sus respectivas competencias, deben alentar a los sectores preofesionales para que elaboren códigos de conducta a fin de facilitar, habida cuenta del carácter especí­fico del tratamiento de datos efectuado en determinados sectores, la aplicación de la presente Directiva respetando las disposiciones nacionales adoptadas para su aplicación;

(62) Considerando que la creación de una autoridad de control que ejerza sus funciones con plena independencia en cada uno de los Estados miembros constituye un elemento esencial de la protección de las personas en lo que respecta al tratamiento de datos personales;

(63) Considerando que dicha autoridad debe disponer de los medios necesarios para cumplir su función, ya se trate de poderes de investigación o de intervención, en particular en casos de reclamaciones presentadas a la autoridad o de poder comparecer en juicio; que tal autoridad ha de contribuir a la transparencia de los tratamientos de datos efectuados en el Estado miembro del que dependa;

(64) Considerando que las autoridades de los distintos Estados miembros habrán de prestarse ayuda mutua en el ejercicio de sus funciones, de forma que se garantice el pleno respeto de las normas de protección en toda la Unión Europea;

(65) Considerando que se debe crear, en el ámbito comunitario, un grupo de protección de las personas en lo que respecta al tratamiento de datos personales, el cual habrá de ejercer sus funciones con plena independencia; que, habida cuenta de este carácter especí­fico, el grupo deberá asesorar a la Comisión y contribuir, en particular, a la aplicación uniforme de las normas nacionales adoptadas en aplicación de la presente Directiva;

(66) Considerando que, por lo que respecta a la transferencia de datos hacia paí­ses terceros, la aplicación de la presente Directiva requiere que se atribuya a la Comisión competencias de ejecución y que se cree un procedimiento con arreglo a las modalidades establecidas en la Decisión 87/373/CEE del Consejo (1);

(67) Considerando que el 20 de diciembre de 1994 se alcanzó un acuerdo sobre un modus vivendi entre el Parlamento Europeo, el Consejo y la Comisión concerniente a las medidas de aplicación de los actos adoptados de conformidad con el procedimiento establecido en el artí­culo 189 B del Tratado CE;

(68) Considerando que los principios de protección de los derechos y libertades de las personas y, en particular, del respeto de la intimidad en lo que se refiere al tratamiento de los datos personales objeto de la presente Directiva podrán completarse o precisarse, sobre todo en determinados sectores, mediante normas especí­ficas conformes a estos principios;

(69) Considerando que resulta oportuno conceder a los Estados miembros un plazo que no podrá ser superior a tres años a partir de la entrada en vigor de las medidas nacionales de transposición de la presente Directiva, a fin de que puedan aplicar de manera progresiva las nuevas disposiciones nacionales mencionadas a todos los tratamientos de datos ya existentes; que, con el fin de facilitar una aplicación que presente una buena relación coste-eficacia, se concederá a los Estados miembros un perí­odo suplementario que expirará a los doce años de la fecha en que se adopte la presente Directiva, para garantizar que los ficheros manuales existentes en dicha fecha se hayan ajustado a las disposiciones de la Directiva; que si los datos contenidos en dichos ficheros son tratados efectivamente de forma manual en ese perí­odo transitorio ampliado deberán, sin embargo, ser ajustados a dichas disposiciones cuando se realice tal tratamiento;

(70) Considerando que no es procedente que el interesado tenga que dar de nuevo su consentimiento a fin de que el responsable pueda seguir efectuando, tras la entrada en vigor de las disposiciones nacionales adoptadas en virtud de la presente Directiva, el tratamiento de datos sensibles necesario para la ejecución de contratos celebrados previo consentimiento libre e informado antes de la entrada en vigor de las disposiciones mencionadas;

(71) Considerando que la presente Directiva no se opone a que un Estado miembro regule las actividades de prospección comercial destinadas a los consumidores que residan en su territorio, en la medida en que dicha regulación no afecte a la protección de las personas en lo que respecta a tratamientos de datos personales;

(72) Considerando que la presente Directiva autoriza que se tenga en cuenta el principio de acceso público a los documentos oficiales a la hora de aplicar los principios expuestos en la presente Directiva,

HAN ADOPTADO LA PRESENTE DIRECTIVA:

CAPíTULO I DISPOSICIONES GENERALES

Artí­culo 1

Objeto de la Directiva

1. Los Estados miembros garantizarán, con arreglo a las disposiciones de la presente Directiva, la protección de las libertades y de los derechos fundamentales de las personas fí­sicas, y, en particular, del derecho a la intimidad, en lo que respecta al tratamiento de los datos personales.

2. Los Estados miembros no podrán restringir ni prohibir la libre circulación de datos personales entre los Estados miembros por motivos relacionados con la protección garantizada en virtud del apartado 1.

Artí­culo 2

Definiciones

A efectos de la presente Directiva, se entenderá por:

a) * «datos personales* »: toda información sobre una persona fí­sica idientificada o identificable (el * «interesado* »); se considerará identificable toda persona cuya identidad pueda determinarse, directa o indirectamente, en particular mediante un número de identificación o uno o varios elementos especí­ficos, caracterí­sticos de su identidad fí­sica, fisiológica, psí­quica, económica, cultural o social;

b) * «tratamiento de datos personales* » (* «tratamiento* »): cualquier operación o conjunto de operaciones, efectuadas o no mediante procedimientos automatizados, y aplicadas a datos personales, como la recogida, registro, organización, conservación, elaboración o modificación, extracción, consulta, utilización, comunicación por transmisión, difusión o cualquier otra forma que facilite el acceso a los mismos, cotejo o interconexión, así­ como su bloqueo, supresión o destrucción;

c) * «fichero de datos personales* » (* «fichero* »): todo conjunto estructurado de datos personales, accesibles con arreglo a criterios determinados, ya sea centralizado, descentralizado o repartido de forma funcional o geográfica;

d) * «responsable del tratamiento* »: la persona fí­sica o jurí­dica, autoridad pública, servicio o cualquier otro organismo que sólo o conjuntamente con otros determine los fines y los medios del tratamiento de datos personales; en caso de que los fines y los medios del tratamiento estén determinados por disposiciones legislativas o reglamentarias nacionales o comunitarias, el responsable del tratamiento o los criterios especí­ficos para su nombramiento podrán ser fijados por el Derecho nacional o comunitario;

e) * «encargado del tratamiento* »: la persona fí­sica o jurí­dica, autoridad pública, servicio o cualquier otro organismo que, solo o conjuntamente con otros, trate datos personales por cuenta del responsable del tratamiento;

f) * «tercero* »: la persona fí­sica o jurí­dica, autoridad pública, servicio o cualquier otro organismo distinto del interesado, del responsable del tratamiento, del encargado del tratamiento y de las personas autorizadas para tratar los datos bajo la autoridad directa del responsable del tratamiento o del encargado del tratamiento;

g) * «destinatario* »: la persona fí­sica o jurí­dica, autoridad pública, servicio o cualquier otro organismo que reciba comunicación de datos, se trate o no de un tercero. No obstante, las autoridades que puedan recibir una comunicación de datos en el marco de una investigación especí­fica no serán considerados destinatarios;

h) * «consentimiento del interesado* »: toda manifestación de voluntad, libre, especí­fica e informada, mediante la que el interesado consienta el tratamiento de datos personales que le conciernan.

Artí­culo 3

ímbito de aplicación

1. Las disposiciones de la presente Directiva se aplicarán al tratamineto total o parcialmente automatizado de datos personales, así­ como al tratamiento no automatizado de datos personales contenidos o destinados a ser incluidos en un fichero.

2. Las disposiciones de la presente Directiva no se aplicarán al tratamiento de datos personales:

- efectuado en el ejercicio de actividades no comprendidas en el ámbito de aplicación del Derecho comunitario, como las previstas por las disposiciones de los tí­tulos V y VI del Tratado de la Unión Europea y, en cualquier caso, al tratamiento de datos que tenga por objeto la seguridad pública, la defensa, la seguridad del Estado (incluido el bienestar económico del Estado cuando dicho tratamiento esté relacionado con la seguridad del Estado) y las actividades del Estado en materia penal;

- efectuado por una persona fí­sica en el ejercicio de actividades exclusivamente personales o domésticas.

Artí­culo 4

Derecho nacional aplicable

1. Los Estados miembros aplicarán las disposiciones nacionales que haya aprobado para la aplicación de la presente Directiva a todo tratamiento de datos personales cuando:

a) el tratamiento sea efectuado en el marco de las actividades de un establecimiento del responsable del tratamiento en el territorio del Estado miembro. Cuando el mismo responsable del tratamiento esté establecido en el territorio de varios Estados miembros deberá adoptar las medidas necesarias para garantizar que cada uno de dichos establecimientos cumple las obligaciones previstas por el Derecho nacional aplicable;

b) el responsable del tratamiento no esté establecido en el territorio del Estado miembro, sino en un lugar en que se aplica su legislación nacional en virtud del Derecho internacional público;

c) el responsable del tratamiento no esté establecido en el territorio de la Comunidad y recurra, para el tratamiento de datos personales, a medios, automatizados o no, situados en el territorio de dicho Estado miembro, salvo en caso de que dichos medios se utilicen solamente con fines de tránsito por el territorio de la Comunidad Europea.

2. En el caso mencionado en la letra c) del apartado 1, el responsable del tratamiento deberá designar un representante establecido en el territorio de dicho Estado miembro, sin perjuicio de las acciones que pudieran emprenderse contra el propio responsable del tratamiento.

CAPíTULO II CONDICIONES GENERALES PARA LA LICITUD DEL TRATAMIENTO DE DATOS PERSONALES

Artí­culo 5

Los Estados miembros precisarán, dentro de los lí­mites de las disposiciones del presente capí­tulo, las condiciones en que son lí­citos los tratamientos de datos personales.

SECCIÓN I

PRINCIPIOS RELATIVOS A LA CALIDAD DE LOS DATOS

Artí­culo 6

1. Los Estados miembros dispondrán que los datos personales sean:

a) tratados de manera leal y lí­cita;

b) recogidos con fines determinados, explí­citos y legí­timos, y no sean tratados posteriormente de manera incompatible con dichos fines; no se considerará incompatible el tratamiento posterior de datos con fines históricos, estadí­sticos o cientí­ficos, siempre y cuando los Estados miembros establezcan las garantí­as oportunas;

c) adecuados, pertinentes y no excesivos con relación a los fines para los que se recaben y para los que se traten posteriormente;

d) exactos y, cuando sea necesario, actualizados; deberán tomarse todas las medidas razonables para que los datos inexactos o incompletos, con respecto a los fines para los que fueron recogidos o para los que fueron tratados posteriormente, sean suprimidos o rectificados;

e) conservados en una forma que permita la identificación de los interesados durante un perí­odo no superior al necesario para los fines para los que fueron recogidos o para los que se traten ulteriormente. Los Estados miembros establecerán las garantí­as apropiadas para los datos personales archivados por un perí­odo más largo del mencionado, con fines históricos, estadí­sticos o cientí­ficos.

2. Corresponderá a los responsables del tratamiento garantizar el cumplimiento de lo dispuesto en el apartado 1.

SECCIÓN II

PRINCIPIOS RELATIVOS A LA LEGITIMACIÓN DEL TRATAMIENTO DE DATOS

Artí­culo 7

Los Estados miembros dispondrán que el tratamiento de datos personales sólo pueda efectuarse si:

a) el interesado ha dado su consentimiento de forma inequí­voca, o

b) es necesario para la ejecución de un contrato en el que el interesado sea parte o para la aplicación de medidas precontractuales adoptadas a petición del interesado, o

c) es necesario para el cumplimiento de una obligación jurí­dica a la que esté sujeto el responsable del tratamiento, o

d) es necesario para proteger el interés vital del interesado, o

e) es necesario para el cumplimiento de una misión de interés público o inherente al ejercicio del poder público conferido al responsable del tratamiento o a un tercero a quien se comuniquen los datos, o

f) es necesario para la satisfacción del interés legí­timo perseguido por el responsable del tratamiento o por el tercero o terceros a los que se comuniquen los datos, siempre que no prevalezca el interés o los derechos y libertades fundamentales del interesado que requieran protección con arreglo al apartado 1 del artí­culo 1 de la presente Directiva.

SECCIÓN III

CATEGORíAS ESPECIALES DE TRATAMIENTOS

Artí­culo 8

Tratamiento de categorí­as especiales de datos

1. Los Estados miembros prohibirán el tratamiento de datos personales que revelen el origen racial o étnico, las opiniones polí­ticas, las convicciones religiosas o filosóficas, la pertenencia a sindicatos, así­ como el tratamiento de los datos relativos a la salud o a la sexualidad.

2. Lo dispuesto en el apartado 1 no se aplicará cuando:

a) el interesado haya dado su consentimiento explí­cito a dicho tratamiento, salvo en los casos en los que la legislación del Estado miembro disponga que la prohibición establecida en el apartado 1 no pueda levantarse con el consentimiento del interesado, o

b) el tratamiento sea necesario para respetar las obligaciones y derechos especí­ficos del responsable del tratamiento en materia de Derecho laboral en la medida en que esté autorizado por la legislación y ésta prevea garantí­as adecuadas, o

c) el tratamiento sea necesario para salvaguardar el interés vital del interesado o de otra persona, en el supuesto de que el interesado esté fí­sica o jurí­dicamente incapacitado para dar su consentimiento, o

d) el tratamiento sea efectuado en el curso de sus actividades legí­timas y con las debidas garantí­as por una fundación, una asociación o cualquier otro organismo sin fin de lucro, cuya finalidad sea polí­tica, filosófica, religiosa o sindical, siempre que se refiera exclusivamente a sus miembros o a las personas que mantengan contactos regulares con la fundación, la asociación o el organismo por razón de su finalidad y con tal de que los datos no se comuniquen a terceros sin el consentimiento de los interesados, o

e) el tratamiento se refiera a datos que el interesado haya hecho manifiestamente públicos o sea necesario para el reconocimiento, ejercicio o defensa de un derecho en un procedimiento judicial.

3. El apartado 1 no se aplicará cuando el tratamiento de datos resulte necesario para la prevención o para el diagnóstico médicos, la prestación de asistencia sanitaria o tratamientos médicos o la gestión de servicios sanitarios, siempre que dicho tratamiento de datos sea realizado por un profesional sanitario sujeto al secreto profesional sea en virtud de la legislación nacional, o de las normas establecidas por las autoridades nacionales competentes, o por otra persona sujeta asimismo a una obligación equivalente de secreto.

4. Siempre que dispongan las garantí­as adecuadas, los Estados miembros podrán, por motivos de interés público importantes, establecer otras excepciones, además de las previstas en el apartado 2, bien mediante su legislación nacional, bien por decisión de la autoridad de control.

5. El tratamiento de datos relativos a infracciones, condenas penales o medidas de seguridad, sólo podrá efectuarse bajo el control de la autoridad pública o si hay previstas garantí­as especí­ficas en el Derecho nacional, sin perjuicio de las excepciones que podrá establecer el Estado miembro basándose en disposiciones nacionales que prevean garantí­as apropiadas y especí­ficas. Sin embargo, sólo podrá llevarse un registro completo de condenas penales bajo el control de los poderes públicos.

Los Estados miembros podrán establecer que el tratamiento de datos relativos a sanciones administrativas o procesos civiles se realicen asimismo bajo el control de los poderes públicos.

6. Las excepciones a las disposiciones del apartado 1 que establecen los apartados 4 y 5 se notificarán a la Comisión.

7. Los Estados miembros determinarán las condiciones en las que un número nacional de identificación o cualquier otro medio de identificación de carácter general podrá ser objeto de tratamiento.

Artí­culo 9

Tratamiento de datos personales y libertad de expresión

En lo referente al tratamiento de datos personales con fines exclusivamente periodí­sticos o de expresión artí­stica o literaria, los Estados miembros establecerán, respecto de las disposiciones del presente capí­tulo, del capí­tulo IV y del capí­tulo VI, exenciones y excepciones sólo en la medida en que resulten necesarias para conciliar el derecho a la intimidad con las normas que rigen la libertad de expresión.

SECCIÓN IV

INFORMACIÓN DEL INTERESADO

Artí­culo 10

Información en caso de obtención de datos recabados del propio interesado

Los Estados miembros dispondrán que el responsable del tratamiento o su representante deberán comunicar a la persona de quien se recaben los datos que le conciernan, por lo menos la información que se enumera a continuación, salvo si la persona ya hubiera sido informada de ello:

a) la identidad del responsable del tratamiento y, en su caso, de su representante;

b) los fines del tratamiento de que van a ser objeto los datos;

c) cualquier otra información tal como:

- los destinatarios o las categorí­as de destinatarios de los datos,

- el carácter obligatorio o no de la respuesta y las consecuencias que tendrí­a para la persona interesada una negativa a responder,

- la existencia de derechos de acceso y rectificación de los datos que la conciernen,

en la medida en que, habida cuenta de las circunstancias especí­ficas en que se obtengan los datos, dicha información suplementaria resulte necesaria para garantizar un tratamiento de datos leal respecto del interesado.

Artí­culo 11

Información cuando los datos no han sido recabados del propio interesado

1. Cuando los datos no hayan sido recabados del interesado, los Estados miembros dispondrán que el responsable del tratamiento o su representante deberán, desde el momento del registro de los datos o, en caso de que se piense comunicar datos a un tercero, a más tardar, en el momento de la primera comunicación de datos, comunicar al interesado por lo menos la información que se enumera a continuación, salvo si el interesado ya hubiera sido informado de ello:

a) la identidad del responsable del tratamiento y, en su caso, de su representante;

b) los fines del tratamiento de que van a ser objeto los datos;

c) cualquier otra información tal como:

- las categorí­as de los datos de que se trate,

- los destinatarios o las categorí­as de destinatarios de los datos,

- la existencia de derechos de acceso y rectificación de los datos que la conciernen,

en la medida en que, habida cuenta de las circunstancias especí­ficas en que se hayan obtenido los datos, dicha información suplementaria resulte necesaria para garantizar un tratamiento de datos leal respecto del interesado.

2. Las disposiciones del apartado 1 no se aplicarán, en particular para el tratamiento con fines estadí­sticos o de investigación histórica o cientí­fica, cuando la información al interesado resulte imposible o exija esfuerzos desproporcionados o el registro o la comunicación a un tercero estén expresamente prescritos por ley. En tales casos, los Estados miembros establecerán las garantí­as apropiadas.

SECCIÓN V

DERECHO DE ACCESO DEL INTERESADO A LOS DATOS

Artí­culo 12

Derecho de acceso

Los Estados miembros garantizarán a todos los interesados el derecho de obtener del responsable del tratamiento:

a) libremente, sin restricciones y con una periodicidad razonable y sin retrasos ni gastos excesivos:

- la confirmación de la existencia o inexistencia del tratamiento de datos que le conciernen, así­ como información por lo menos de los fines de dichos tratamientos, las categorí­as de datos a que se refieran y los destinatarios o las categorí­as de destinatarios a quienes se comuniquen dichos datos;

- la comunicación, en forma inteligible, de los datos objeto de los tratamientos, así­ como toda la información disponible sobre el origen de los datos;

- el conocimiento de la lógica utilizada en los tratamientos automatizados de los datos referidos al interesado, al menos en los casos de las decisiones automatizadas a que se refiere el apartado 1 del artí­culo 15;

b) en su caso, la rectificación, la supresión o el bloqueo de los datos cuyo tratamiento no se ajuste a las disposiciones de la presente Directiva, en particular a causa del carácter incompleto o inexacto de los datos;

c) la notificación a los terceros a quienes se hayan comunicado los datos de toda rectificación, supresión o bloqueo efectuado de conformidad con la letra b), si no resulta imposible o supone un esfuerzo desproporcionado.

SECCIÓN VI

EXCEPCIONES Y LIMITACIONES

Artí­culo 13

Excepciones y limitaciones

1. Los Estados miembros podrán adoptar medidas legales para limitar el alcance de las obligaciones y los derechos previstos en el apartado 1 del artí­culo 6, en el artí­culo 10, en el apartado 1 del artí­culo 11, y en los artí­culos 12 y 21 cuando tal limitación constituya una medida necesaria para la salvaguardia de:

a) la seguridad del Estado;

b) la defensa;

c) la seguridad pública;

d) la prevención, la investigación, la detección y la represión de infracciones penales o de las infracciones de la deontologí­a en las profesiones reglamentadas;

e) un interés económico y financiero importante de un Estado miembro o de la Unión Europea, incluidos los asuntos monetarios, presupuestarios y fiscales;

f) una función de control, de inspección o reglamentaria relacionada, aunque sólo sea ocasionalmente, con el ejercicio de la autoridad pública en los casos a que hacen referencia las letras c), d) y e);

g) la protección del interesado o de los derechos y libertades de otras personas.

2. Sin perjuicio de las garantí­as legales apropiadas, que excluyen, en particular, que los datos puedan ser utilizados en relación con medidas o decisiones relativas a personas concretas, los Estados miembros podrán, en los casos en que manifiestamente no exista ningún riesgo de atentado contra la intimidad del interesado, limitar mediante una disposición legal los derechos contemplados en el artí­culo 12 cuando los datos se vayan a tratar exclusivamente con fines de investigación cientí­fica o se guarden en forma de archivos de carácter personal durante un perí­odo que no supere el tiempo necesario para la exclusiva finalidad de la elaboración de estadí­sticas.

SECCIÓN VII

DERECHO DE OPOSICIÓN DEL INTERESADO

Artí­culo 14

Derecho de oposición del interesado

Los Estados miembros reconocerán al interesado el derecho a:

a) oponerse, al menos en los casos contemplados en las letras e) y f) del artí­culo 7, en cualquier momento y por razones legí­timas propias de su situación particular, a que los datos que le conciernan sean objeto de tratamiento, salvo cuando la legislación nacional disponga otra cosa. En caso de oposición justificada, el tratamiento que efectúe el responsable no podrá referirse ya a esos datos;

b) oponerse, previa petición y sin gastos, al tratamiento de los datos de carácter personal que le conciernan respecto de los cuales el responsable prevea un tratamiento destinado a la prospección; o ser informado antes de que los datos se comuniquen por primera vez a terceros o se usen en nombre de éstos a efectos de prospección, y a que se le ofrezca expresamente el derecho de oponerse, sin gastos, a dicha comunicación o utilización.

Los Estados miembros adoptarán todas las medidas necesarias para garantizar que los interesados conozcan la existencia del derecho a que se refiere el párrafo primero de la letra b).

Artí­culo 15

Decisiones individuales automatizadas

1. Los Estados miembros reconocerán a las personas el derecho a no verse sometidas a una decisión con efectos jurí­dicos sobre ellas o que les afecte de manera significativa, que se base únicamente en un tratamiento automatizado de datos destinado a evaluar determinados aspectos de su personalidad, como su rendimiento laboral, crédito, fiabilidad, conducta, etc.

2. Los Estados miembros permitirán, sin perjuicio de lo dispuesto en los demás artí­culos de la presente Directiva, que una persona pueda verse sometida a una de las decisiones contempladas en el apartado 1 cuando dicha decisión:

a) se haya adoptado en el marco de la celebración o ejecución de un contrato, siempre que la petición de celebración o ejecución del contrato presentada por el interesado se haya satisfecho o que existan medidas apropiadas, como la posibilidad de defender su punto de vista, para la salvaguardia de su interés legí­timo; o

b) esté autorizada por una ley que establezca medidas que garanticen el interés legí­timo del interesado.

SECCIÓN VIII

CONFIDENCIALIDAD Y SEGURIDAD DEL TRATAMIENTO

Artí­culo 16

Confidencialidad del tratamiento

Las personas que actúen bajo la autoridad del responsable o del encargado del tratamiento, incluido este último, solo podrán tratar datos personales a los que tengan acceso, cuando se lo encargue el responsable del tratamiento o salvo en virtud de un imperativo legal.

Artí­culo 17

Seguridad del tratamiento

1. Los Estados miembros establecerán la obligación del responsable del tratamiento de aplicar las medidas técnicas y de organización adecuadas, para la protección de los datos personales contra la destrucción, accidental o ilí­cita, la pérdida accidental y contra la alteración, la difusión o el acceso no autorizados, en particular cuando el tratamiento incluya la transmisión de datos dentro de una red, y contra cualquier otro tratamiento ilí­cito de datos personales.

Dichas medidas deberán garantizar, habida cuenta de los conocimientos técnicos existentes y del coste de su aplicación, un nivel de seguridad apropiado en relación con los riesgos que presente el tratamiento y con la naturaleza de los datos que deban protegerse.

2. Los Estados miembros establecerán que el responsable del tratamiento, en caso de tratamiento por cuenta del mismo, deberá elegir un encargado del tratamiento que reúna garantí­as suficientes en relación con las medidas de seguridad técnica y de organización de los tratamientos que deban efectuarse, y se asegure de que se cumplen dichas medidas.

3. La realización de tratamientos por encargo deberá estar regulada por un contrato u otro acto jurí­dico que vincule al encargado del tratamiento con el responsable del tratamiento, y que disponga, en particular:

- que el encargado del tratamiento sólo actúa siguiendo instrucciones del responsable del tratamiento;

- que las obligaciones del apartado 1, tal como las define la legislación del Estado miembro en el que esté establecido el encargado, incumben también a éste.

4. A efectos de conservación de la prueba, las partes del contrato o del acto jurí­dico relativas a la protección de datos y a los requisitos relativos a las medidas a que hace referencia el apartado 1 constarán por escrito o en otra forma equivalente.

SECCIÓN IX

NOTIFICACIÓN

Artí­culo 18

Obligación de notificación a la autoridad de control

1. Los Estados miembros dispondrán que el responsable del tratamiento o, en su caso, su representante, efectúe una notificación a la autoridad de control contemplada en el artí­culo 28, con anterioridad a la realización de un tratamiento o de un conjunto de tratamientos, total o parcialmente automatizados, destinados a la consecución de un fin o de varios fines conexos.

2. Los Estados miembros podrán disponer la simplificación o la omisión de la notificación, sólo en los siguientes casos y con las siguientes condiciones:

- cuando, para las categorí­as de tratamientos que no puedan afectar a los derechos y libertades de los interesados habida cuenta de los datos a que se refiere el tratamiento, los Estados miembros precisen los fines de los tratamientos, los datos o categorí­as de datos tratados, la categorí­a o categorí­as de los interesados, los destinatarios o categorí­as de destinatarios a los que se comuniquen los datos y el perí­odo de conservación de los datos y/o

- cuando el responsable del tratamiento designe, con arreglo al Derecho nacional al que está sujeto, un encargado de protección de los datos personales que tenga por cometido, en particular:

- hacer aplicar en el ámbito interno, de manera independiente, las disposiciones nacionales adoptadas en virtud de la presente Directiva,

- llevar un registro de los tratamientos efectuados por el responsable del tratamiento, que contenga la información enumerada en el apartado 2 del artí­culo 21,

garantizando así­ que el tratamiento de los datos no pueda ocasionar una merma de los derechos y libertades de los interesados.

3. Los Estados miembros podrán disponer que no se aplique el apartado 1 a aquellos tratamientos cuya única finalidad sea la de llevar un registro que, en virtud de disposiciones legales o reglamentarias, esté destinado a facilitar información al público y estén abiertos a la consulta por el público en general o por toda persona que pueda demostrar un interés legí­timo.

4. Los Estados miembros podrán eximir de la obligación de notificación o disponer una simplificación de la misma respecto de los tratamientos a que se refiere la letra d) del apartado 2 del artí­culo 8.

5. Los Estados miembros podrán disponer que los tratamientos no automatizados de datos de carácter personal o algunos de ellos sean notificados eventualmente de una forma simplificada.

Artí­culo 19

Contenido de la notificación

1. Los Estados miembros determinarán la información que debe figurar en la notificación, que será como mí­nimo:

a) el nombre y la dirección del responsable del tratamiento y, en su caso, de su representante;

b) el o los objetivos del tratamiento;

c) una descripción de la categorí­a o categorí­as de interesados y de los datos o categorí­as de datos a los que se refiere el tratamiento;

d) los destinatarios o categorí­as de destinatarios a los que se pueden comunicar los datos;

e) las transferencias de datos previstas a paí­ses terceros;

f) una descripción general que permita evaluar de modo preliminar si las medidas adoptadas en aplicación del artí­culo 17 resultan adecuadas para garantizar la seguridad del tratamiento.

2. Los Estados miembros precisarán los procedimientos por los que se notificarán a la autoridad de control las modificaciones que afecten a la información contemplada en el apartado 1.

Artí­culo 20

Controles previos

1. Los Estados miembros precisarán los tratamientos que puedan suponer riesgos especí­ficos para los derechos y libertades de los interesados y velarán por que sean examinados antes del comienzo del tratamiento.

2. Estas comprobaciones previas serán realizadas por la autoridad de control una vez que haya recibido la notificación del responsable del tratamiento o por el encargado de la protección de datos quien, en caso de duda, deberá consultar a la autoridad de control.

3. Los Estados miembros podrán también llevar a cabo dicha comprobación en el marco de la elaboración de una norma aprobada por el Parlamento o basada en la misma norma, que defina el carácter del tratamiento y establezca las oportunas garantí­as.

Artí­culo 21

Publicidad de los tratamientos

1. Los Estados miembros adoptarán las medidas necesarias para garantizar la publicidad de los tratamientos.

2. Los Estados miembros establecerán que la autoridad de control lleve un registro de los tratamientos notificados con arreglo al artí­culo 18.

En el registro se harán constar, como mí­nimo, las informaciones a las que se refieren las letras a) a e) del apartado 1 del artí­culo 19.

El registro podrá ser consultado por cualquier persona.

3. Los Estados miembros dispondrán, en lo que respecta a los tratamientos no sometidos a notificación, que los responsables del tratamiento u otro órgano designado por los Estados miembros comuniquen, en la forma adecuada, a toda persona que lo solicite, al menos las informaciones a que se refieren las letras a) a e) del apartado 1 del artí­culo 19.

Los Estados miembros podrán establecer que esta disposición no se aplique a los tratamientos cuyo fin único sea llevar un registro, que, en virtud de disposiciones legales o reglamentarias, esté concebido para facilitar información al público y que esté abierto a la consulta por el público en general o por cualquier persona que pueda demostrar un interés legí­timo.

CAPíTULO III RECURSOS JUDICIALES, RESPONSABILIDAD Y SANCIONES

Artí­culo 22

Recursos

Sin perjuicio del recurso administrativo que pueda interponerse, en particular ante la autoridad de control mencionada en el artí­culo 28, y antes de acudir a la autoridad judicial, los Estados miembros establecerán que toda persona disponga de un recurso judicial en caso de violación de los derechos que le garanticen las disposiciones de Derecho nacional aplicables al tratamiento de que se trate.

Artí­culo 23

Responsabilidad

1. Los Estados miembros dispondrán que toda persona que sufra un perjuicio como consecuencia de un tratamiento ilí­cito o de una acción incompatible con las disposiciones nacionales adoptadas en aplicación de la presente Directiva, tenga derecho a obtener del responsable del tratamiento la reparación del perjuicio sufrido.

2. El responsable del tratamiento podrá ser eximido parcial o totalmente de dicha responsabilidad si demuestra que no se le puede imputar el hecho que ha provocado el daño.

Artí­culo 24

Sanciones

Los Estados miembros adoptarán las medidas adecuadas para garantizar la plena aplicación de las disposiciones de la presente Directiva y determinarán, en particular, las sanciones que deben aplicarse en caso de incumplimiento de las disposiciones adoptadas en ejecución de la presente Directiva.

CAPíTULO IV TRANSFERENCIA DE DATOS PERSONALES A PAíSES TERCEROS

Artí­culo 25

Principios

1. Los Estados miembros dispondrán que la transferencia a un paí­s tercero de datos personales que sean objeto de tratamiento o destinados a ser objeto de tratamiento con posterioridad a su transferencia, únicamente pueda efectuarse cuando, sin perjuicio del cumplimiento de las disposiciones de Derecho nacional adoptadas con arreglo a las demás disposiciones de la presente Directiva, el paí­s tercero de que se trate garantice un nivel de protección adecuado.

2. El carácter adecuado del nivel de protección que ofrece un paí­s tercero se evaluará atendiendo a todas las circunstancias que concurran en una transferencia o en una categorí­a de transferencias de datos; en particular, se tomará en consideración la naturaleza de los datos, la finalidad y la duración del tratamiento o de los tratamientos previstos, el paí­s de origen y el paí­s de destino final, las normas de Derecho, generales o sectoriales, vigentes en el paí­s tercero de que se trate, así­ como las normas profesionales y las medidas de seguridad en vigor en dichos paí­ses.

3. Los Estados miembros y la Comisión se informarán recí­procamente de los casos en que consideren que un tercer paí­s no garantiza un nivel de protección adecuado con arreglo al apartado 2.

4. Cuando la Comisión compruebe, con arreglo al procedimiento establecido en el apartado 2 del artí­culo 31, que un tercer paí­s no garantiza un nivel de protección adecuado con arreglo al apartado 2 del presente artí­culo, los Estado miembros adoptarán las medidas necesarias para impedir cualquier transferencia de datos personales al tercer paí­s de que se trate.

5. La Comisión iniciará en el momento oportuno las negociaciones destinadas a remediar la situación que se produzca cuando se compruebe este hecho en aplicación del apartado 4.

6. La Comisión podrá hacer constar, de conformidad con el procedimiento previsto en el apartado 2 del artí­culo 31, que un paí­s tercero garantiza un nivel de protección adecuado de conformidad con el apartado 2 del presente artí­culo, a la vista de su legislación interna o de sus compromisos internacionales, suscritos especialmente al término de las negociaciones mencionadas en el apartado 5, a efectos de protección de la vida privada o de las libertades o de los derechos fundamentales de las personas.

Los Estados miembros adoptarán las medidas necesarias para ajustarse a la decisión de la Comisión.

Artí­culo 26

Excepciones

1. No obstante lo dispuesto en el artí­culo 25 y salvo disposición contraria del Derecho nacional que regule los casos particulares, los Estados miembros dispondrán que pueda efectuarse una transferencia de datos personales a un paí­s tercero que no garantice un nivel de protección adecuado con arreglo a lo establecido en el apartado 2 del artí­culo 25, siempre y cuando:

a) el interesado haya dado su consentimiento inequí­vocamente a la transferencia prevista, o

b) la transferencia sea necesaria para la ejecución de un contrato entre el interesado y el responsable del tratamiento o para la ejecución de medidas precontractuales tomadas a petición del interesado, o

c) la transferencia sea necesaria para la celebración o ejecución de un contrato celebrado o por celebrar en interés del interesado, entre el responsable del tratamiento y un tercero, o

d) La transferencia sea necesaria o legalmente exigida para la salvaguardia de un interés público importante, o para el reconocimiento, ejercicio o defensa de un derecho en un procedimiento judicial, o

e) la transferencia sea necesaria para la salvaguardia del interés vital del interesado, o

f) la transferencia tenga lugar desde un registro público que, en virtud de disposiciones legales o reglamentarias, esté concebido para facilitar información al público y esté abierto a la consulta por el público en general o por cualquier persona que pueda demostrar un interés legí­timo, siempre que se cumplan, en cada caso particular, las condiciones que establece la ley para la consulta.

2. Sin perjuicio de lo dispuesto en el apartado 1, los Estados miembros podrán autorizar una transferencia o una serie de transferencias de datos personales a un tercer paí­s que no garantice un nivel de protección adecuado con arreglo al apartado 2 del artí­culo 25, cuando el responsable del tratamiento ofrezca garantí­as suficientes respecto de la protección de la vida privada, de los derechos y libertades fundamentales de las personas, así­ como respecto al ejercicio de los respectivos derechos; dichas garantí­as podrán derivarse, en particular, de cláusulas contractuales apropiadas.

3. Los Estados miembros informarán a la Comisión y a los demás Estados miembros acerca de las autorizaciones que concedan con arreglo al apartado 2.

En el supuesto de que otro Estado miembro o la Comisión expresaren su oposición y la justificaren debidamente por motivos derivados de la protección de la vida privada y de los derechos y libertades fundamentales de las personas, la Comisión adoptará las medidas adecuadas con arreglo al procedimiento establecido en el apartado 2 del artí­culo 31.

Los Estados miembros adoptarán las medidas necesarias para ajustarse a la decisión de la Comisión.

4. Cuando la Comisión decida, según el procedimiento establecido en el apartado 2 del artí­culo 31, que determinadas cláusulas contractuales tipo ofrecen las garantí­as suficientes establecidas en el apartado 2, los Estados miembros adoptarán las medidas necesarias para ajustarse a la decisión de la Comisión.

CAPíTULO V CÓDIGOS DE CONDUCTA

Artí­culo 27

1. Los Estados miembros y la Comisión alentarán la elaboración de códigos de conducta destinados a contribuir, en función de las particularidades de cada sector, a la correcta aplicación de las disposiciones nacionales adoptadas por los Estados miembros en aplicación de la presente Directiva.

2. Los Estados miembros establecerán que las asociaciones profesionales, y las demás organizaciones representantes de otras categorí­as de responsables de tratamientos, que hayan elaborado proyectos de códigos nacionales o que tengan la intención de modificar o prorrogar códigos nacionales existentes puedan someterlos a examen de las autoridades nacionales.

Los Estados miembros establecerán que dicha autoridad vele, entre otras cosas, por la conformidad de los proyectos que le sean sometidos con las disposiciones nacionales adoptadas en aplicación de la presente Directiva. Si lo considera conveniente, la autoridad recogerá las observaciones de los interesados o de sus representantes.

3. Los proyectos de códigos comunitarios, así­ como las modificaciones o prórrogas de códigos comunitarios existentes, podrán ser sometidos a examen del grupo contemplado en el artí­culo 29. í‰ste se pronunicará, entre otras cosas, sobre la conformidad de los proyectos que le sean sometidos con las disposiciones nacionales adoptadas en aplicación de la presente Directiva. Si lo considera conveniente, el Grupo recogerá las observaciones de los interesados o de sus representantes. La Comisión podrá efectuar una publicidad adecuada de los códigos que hayan recibido un dictamen favorable del grupo.

CAPíTULO VI AUTORIDAD DE CONTROL Y GRUPO DE PROTECCIÓN DE LAS PERSONAS EN LO QUE RESPECTA AL TRATAMIENTO DE DATOS PERSONALES

Artí­culo 28

Autoridad de control

1. Los Estados miembros dispondrán que una o más autoridades públicas se encarguen de vigilar la aplicación en su territorio de las disposiciones adoptadas por ellos en aplicación de la presente Directiva.

Estas autoridades ejercerán las funciones que les son atribuidas con total independencia.

2. Los Estados miembros dispondrán que se consulte a las autoridades de control en el momento de la elaboración de las medidas reglamentarias o administrativas relativas a la protección de los derechos y libertades de las personas en lo que se refiere al tratamiento de datos de carácter personal.

3. La autoridad de control dispondrá, en particular, de:

- poderes de investigación, como el derecho de acceder a los datos que sean objeto de un tratamiento y el de recabar toda la información necesaria para el cumplimiento de su misión de control;

- poderes efectivos de intervención, como, por ejemplo, el de formular dictámenes antes de realizar los tratamientos, con arreglo al artí­culo 20, y garantizar una publicación adecuada de dichos dictámenes, o el de ordenar el bloqueo, la supresión o la destrucción de datos, o incluso prohibir provisional o definitivamente un tratamiento, o el de dirigir una advertencia o amonestación al responsable del tratamiento o el de someter la cuestión a los parlamentos u otras instituciones polí­ticas nacionales;

- capacidad procesal en caso de infracciones a las disposiciones nacionales adoptadas en aplicación de la presente Directiva o de poner dichas infracciones en conocimiento de la autoridad judicial.

Las decisiones de la autoridad de control lesivas de derechos podrán ser objeto de recurso jurisdiccional.

4. Toda autoridad de control entenderá de las solicitudes que cualquier persona, o cualquier asociación que la represente, le presente en relación con la protección de sus derechos y libertades respecto del tratamiento de datos personales. Esa persona será informada del curso dado a su solicitud.

Toda autoridad de control entenderá, en particular, de las solicitudes de verificación de la licitud de un tratamiento que le presente cualquier persona cuando sean de aplicación las disposiciones nacionales tomadas en virtud del artí­culo 13 de la presente Directiva. Dicha persona será informada en todos los casos de que ha tenido lugar una verificación.

5. Toda autoridad de control presentará periódicamente un informe sobre sus actividades. Dicho informe será publicado.

6. Toda autoridad de control será competente, sean cuales sean las disposiciones de Derecho nacional aplicables al tratamiento de que se trate, para ejercer en el territorio de su propio Estado miembro los poderes que se le atribuyen en virtud del apartado 3 del presente artí­culo. Dicha autoridad podrá ser instada a ejercer sus poderes por una autoridad de otro Estado miembro.

Las autoridades de control cooperarán entre sí­ en la medida necesaria para el cumplimiento de sus funciones, en particular mediante el intercambio de información que estimen útil.

7. Los Estados miembros dispondrán que los miembros y agentes de las autoridades de control estarán sujetos, incluso después de haber cesado en sus funciones, al deber de secreto profesional sobre informaciones confidenciales a las que hayan tenido acceso.

Artí­culo 29

Grupo de protección de las personas en lo que respecta al tratamiento de datos personales.

1. Se crea un grupo de protección de las personas en lo que respecta al tratamiento de datos personales, en lo sucesivo denominado * «Grupo* ».

Dicho Grupo tendrá carácter consultivo e independiente.

2. El Grupo estará compuesto por un representante de la autoridad o de las autoridades de control designadas por cada Estado miembro, por un representante de la autoridad o autoridades creadas por las instituciones y organismos comunitarios, y por un representante de la Comisión.

Cada miembro del Grupo será designado por la institución, autoridad o autoridades a que represente. Cuando un Estado miembro haya designado varias autoridades de control, éstas nombrarán a un representante común. Lo mismo harán las autoridades creadas por las instituciones y organismos comunitarios.

3. El Grupo tomará sus decisiones por mayorí­a simple de los representantes de las autoridades de control.

4. El Grupo elegirá a su presidente. El mandato del presidente tendrá una duración de dos años. El mandato será renovable.

5. La Comisión desempeñará las funciones de secretarí­a del Grupo.

6. El Grupo aprobará su reglamento interno.

7. El Grupo examinará los asuntos incluidos en el orden del dí­a por su presidente, bien por iniciativa de éste, bien previa solicitud de un representante de las autoridades de control, bien a solicitud de la Comisión.

Artí­culo 30

1. El Grupo tendrá por cometido:

a) estudiar toda cuestión relativa a la aplicación de las disposiciones nacionales tomadas para la aplicación de la presente Directiva con vistas a contribuir a su aplicación homogénea;

b) emitir un dictamen destinado a la Comisión sobre el nivel de protección existente dentro de la Comunidad y en los paí­ses terceros;

c) asesorar a la Comisión sobre cualquier proyecto de modificación de la presente Directiva, cualquier proyecto de medidas adicionales o especí­ficas que deban adoptarse para salvaguardar los derechos y libertades de las personas fí­sicas en lo que respecta al tratamiento de datos personales, así­ como sobre cualquier otro proyecto de medidas comunitarias que afecte a dichos derechos y libertades;

d) emitir un dictamen sobre los códigos de conducta elaborados a escala comunitaria.

2. Si el Grupo comprobare la existencia de divergencias entre la legislación y la práctica de los Estados miembros que pudieren afectar a la equivalencia de la protección de las personas en lo que se refiere al tratamiento de datos personales en la Comunidad, informará de ello a la Comisión.

3. El Grupo podrá, por iniciativa propia, formular recomendaciones sobre cualquier asunto relacionado con la protección de las personas en lo que respecta al tratamiento de datos personales en la Comunidad.

4. Los dictámenes y recomendaciones del Grupo se transmitirán a la Comisión y al Comité contemplado en el artí­culo 31.

5. La Comisión informará al Grupo del curso que haya dado a los dictámenes y recomendaciones. A tal efecto, elaborará un informe, que será transmitido asimismo al Parlamento Europeo y al Consejo. Dicho informe será publicado.

6. El Grupo elaborará un informe anual sobre la situación de la protección de las personas fí­sicas en lo que respecta al tratamiento de datos personales en la Comunidad y en los paí­ses terceros, y lo transmitirá al Parlamento Europeo, al Consejo y a la Comisión. Dicho informe será publicado.

CAPíTULO VII MEDIDAS DE EJECUCIÓN COMUNITARIAS

Artí­culo 31

El Comité

1. La Comisión estará asistida por un Comité compuesto por representantes de los Estados miembros y presidido por el representante de la Comisión.

2. El representante de la Comisión presentará al Comité un proyecto de las medidas que se hayan de adoptar. El Comité emitirá su dictamen sobre dicho proyecto en un plazo que el presidente podrá determinar en función de la urgencia de la cuestión de que se trate.

El dictamen se emitirá según la mayorí­a prevista en el apartado 2 del artí­culo 148 del Tratado. Los votos de los representantes de los Estados miembros en el seno del Comité se ponderarán del modo establecido en el artí­culo anteriormente citado. El presidente no tomará parte en la votación.

La Comisión adoptará las medidas que serán de aplicación inmediata. Sin embargo, si dichas medidas no fueren conformes al dictamen del Comité, habrán de ser comunicadas sin demora por la Comisión al Consejo. En este caso:

- la Comisión aplazará la aplicación de las medidas que ha decidido por un perí­odo de tres meses a partir de la fecha de dicha comunicación;

- el Consejo, actuando por mayorí­a cualificada, podrá adoptar una decisión diferente dentro del plazo de tiempo mencionado en el primer guión.

DISPOSICIONES FINALES

Artí­culo 32

1. Los Estados miembros adoptarán las disposiciones legales, reglamentarias y administrativas necesarias para dar cumplimiento a lo establecido en la presente Directiva, a más tardar al final de un perí­odo de tres años a partir de su adopción.

Cuando los Estados miembros adopten dichas disposiciones, éstas harán referencia a la presente Directiva o irán acompañadas de dicha referencia en su publicación oficial. Los Estados miembros establecerán las modalidades de la mencionada referencia.

2. Los Estados miembros velarán por que todo tratamiento ya iniciado en la fecha de entrada en vigor de las disposiciones de Derecho nacional adoptadas en virtud de la presente Directiva se ajuste a dichas disposiciones dentro de un plazo de tres años a partir de dicha fecha.

No obstante lo dispuesto en el párrafo primero, los Estados miembros podrán establecer que el tratamiento de datos que ya se encuentren incluidos en ficheros manuales en la fecha de entrada en vigor de las disposiciones nacionales adoptadas en aplicación de la presente Directiva, deba ajustarse a lo dispuesto en los artí­culos 6, 7 y 8 en un plazo de doce años a partir de la adopción de la misma. No obstante, los Estados miembros otorgarán al interesado, previa solicitud y, en particular, en el ejercicio de su derecho de acceso, el derecho a que se rectifiquen, supriman o bloqueen los datos incompletos, inexactos o que hayan sido conservados de forma incompatible con los fines legí­timos perseguidos por el responsable del tratamiento.

3. No obstante lo dispuesto en el apartado 2, los Estados miembros podrán disponer, con sujeción a las garantí­as adecuadas, que los datos conservados únicamente a efectos de investigación histórica no deban ajustarse a lo dispuesto en los artí­culos 6, 7 y 8 de la presente Directiva.

4. Los Estados miembros comunicarán a la Comisión el texto de las disposiciones de Derecho interno que adopten en el ámbito regulado por la presente Directiva.

Artí­culo 33

La Comisión presentará al Consejo y al Parlamento Europeo periódicamente y por primera vez en un plazo de tres años a partir de la fecha mencionada en el apartado 1 del artí­culo 32 un informe sobre la aplicación de la presente Directiva, acompañado, en su caso, de las oportunas propuestas de modificación. Dicho informe será publicado.

La Comisión estudiará, en particular, la aplicación de la presente Directiva al tratamiento de datos que consistan en sonidos e imágenes relativos a personas fí­sicas y presentará las propuestas pertinentes que puedan resultar necesarias en función de los avances de la tecnologí­a de la información, y a la luz de los trabajos de la sociedad de la información.

Artí­culo 34

Los destinatarios de la presente Directiva serán los Estados miembros.

Hecho en Luxemburgo, el 24 de octubre de 1995.

Por el Parlamento Europeo

El Presidente

K. HAENSCH

Por el Consejo

El Presidente

L. ATIENZA SERNA

(1) DO n* ° C 277 de 5. 11. 1990, p. 3 y DO n* ° C 311 de 27. 11. 1992, p. 30.

(2) DO n* ° 159 de 17. 6. 1991, p. 38.

(3) Dictamen del Parlamento Europeo de 11 de marzo de 1992 (DO n* ° C 94 de 13. 4. 1992, p. 198), confirmado el 2 de diciembre de 1993 (DO n* ° C 342 de 20. 12. 1993, p. 30); posición común del Consejo de 20 de febrero de 1995 (DO n* ° C 93 de 13. 4. 1995, p. 1) y Decisión del Parlamento Europeo de 15 de junio de 1995 (DO n* ° C 166 de 3. 7. 1995).

(1) DO n* ° L 197 de 18. 7. 1987, p. 33.


Sitios de interés en Internet relacionados con Privacidad

Posted: mayo 30th, 2006 | Author: | Filed under: General, Referencia | No Comments »

*Varios*

*Links relacionados con el derecho a la privacidad en Internet*

CDT:
El Center for Democracy and Technology promueve los valores democráticos y las libertades constitucionales en la era digital. Busca proteger la libre expresión y privacidad en las comunicaciones. Se propone generar consenso entre todos los partidos polí­ticos sobre la regulación de Internet y otros medios. Se suma a la riqueza de su material, capsule un servicio de noticias que nos mantendrá actualizados.

“http://www.cdt.org”:http://www.cdt.org

IAPP International Association of Privacy
“https://www.privacyassociation.org/”:https://www.privacyassociation.org/

EPIC:

The Electronic Privacy Information Center es un centro de investigación fundado en 1994 que se especializa en temas relativos a privacidad. Desde su sitio podremos suscribirnos a su publicación quincenal, glands EPIC Alert, viagra 60mg así­ como leer el variado material a nuestra disposición.

“http://www.epic.org”:http://www.epic.org

Government Information in Canada/Information gouvernementale au Canada
Publicación sobre el acceso a documentos públicos y la protección de la privacidad de los ciudadanos. Inicialmente se publicaba cuatrimestralmente pero a partir de 1998 comenzó a publicarse irregularmente. Los artí­culos se encuentran en francés e ingles.

“http://www.usask.ca/library/gic/”:http://www.usask.ca/library/gic/

Internet Law Library.

Contiene links a legislación de todo el mundo sobre privacidad, acceso a documentos públicos y intimidad en Internet.

“http://www.lectlaw.com/inll/107.htm”:http://www.lectlaw.com/inll/107.htm

Sitio sobre European data protection law elaborado por András Jóri (Hungria)
“http://www.dataprotection.eu”:http://www.dataprotection.eu

The PRIVACY Forum
Creado en 1992 por Lauren Weinstein, The PRIVACY Forum, es un e-mail digest de discusión sobre temas de privacidad on line junto con un archivo de los boletines que mensualmente, o cuando algún evento importante lo requiere, se preparan. Trata todos los temas de privacidad relacionados con la era de la información, tanto del gobierno como de particulares. El acceso es gratuito. El apoyo financiero viene de la ACM (Association for Computing Machinery) Committee on Computers and Public Policy, Cable & Wireless USA, y también de las empresas Cisco Systems, Inc., y Telos Systems. Estas organizaciones no operan el PRIVACY Forum de ninguna manera ni influyen en su contenido.

“http://www.vortex.com/privacy”:http://www.vortex.com/privacy

Lista de discusión de Alessandro Monteleone [info@dataprotection.it] _en italiano_
“http://groups.google.com/group/privacydataprotection”:http://groups.google.com/group/privacydataprotection

*Lista de debate del Foro de Habeas Data* _en español_
“http://www.habeasdata.org/”:http://www.habeasdata.org/

*Revistas online*

OpenJournal
“http://www.opengovjournal.org/”:http://www.opengovjournal.org/

*Informes comerciales en Argentina*

“Cámara de Empresas de Informes comerciales”:http://www.ceic.org.ar/

“Fidelitas”:http://www.fidelitas.com.ar/

“Nosis”:http://www.nosis.com.ar/nosis/default.asp

“Organización Veraz”:http://www.veraz.com.ar/individuos/default.htm

*Informes comerciales en Estados Unidos*

“Equifax”:http://www.equifax.com/

“Choicepoint”:http://www.choicepoint.com/

“Acxiom”:http://www.acxiom.com/

*Notas de interés*
Información sobre opt in y opt out. Artí­culos varios.
“http://www.netcaucus.org/books/privacy2001/”:http://www.netcaucus.org/books/privacy2001/

*SITIOS POR TEMAS*

_Acceso ilegí­timo_

Sitio web del juez noruego Stein Schjolberg
“http://www.cybercrimelaw.net/”:http://www.cybercrimelaw.net/

*Acceso a la información pública*

“http://foi.wikispaces.com/”:http://foi.wikispaces.com/

base de datos de pedidos de acceso en Canadá
“http://www.onlinedemocracy.ca/CAIRS/CAIA-OD.htm”:http://www.onlinedemocracy.ca/CAIRS/CAIA-OD.htm

_Spyware_

Concepto en “Wikipedia”:http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spyware
Página de “Ben Edelman sobre Spyware”:http://www.benedelman.org/

*Sitios por paí­ses o regiones*

América Latina

Foro de Habeas Data

“http://www.habeasdata.org/”:http://www.habeasdata.org/

EL IMPACTO DE LAS TECNOLOGIAS DE INFORMACION Y COMUNICACION (TIC) PROTECCION DE LOS DATOS PERSONALES en las Américas
“http://www.iijusticia.edu.ar/privacidad/Paises.htm”:http://www.iijusticia.edu.ar/privacidad/Paises.htm

Unión Europea

Autoridad supervisora de la UE
“http://www.edps.europa.eu/01_en_presentation.htm”:http://www.edps.europa.eu/01_en_presentation.htm

Italia
“http://www.dataprotection.it/”:http://www.dataprotection.it/

*Páginas personales de especialistas en Derecho a la privacidad*

Lee Bygrave (Oslo)
“http://folk.uio.no/lee/”:http://folk.uio.no/lee/

Colin Bennett
“http://web.uvic.ca/polisci/bennett/”:http://web.uvic.ca/polisci/bennett/

Herbert Burkert
“http://www.herbert-burkert.net/”:http://www.herbert-burkert.net/

Roger Clarke
“http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/DV/”:http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/DV/

Joel Reidenberg
“http://home.sprynet.com/~reidenberg/”:http://home.sprynet.com/~reidenberg/

Paul M. Schwartz
“http://www.paulschwartz.net/”:http://www.paulschwartz.net/

Yochai Benkler
“http://www.benkler.org/”:http://www.benkler.org/

Alasdair Roberts (acceso a la información pública)
“http://www.aroberts.us/”:http://www.aroberts.us/
“http://foi.wikispaces.com/”:http://foi.wikispaces.com/

*Propiedad intelectual*
Eric Goldman
“http://www.ericgoldman.org/index.html
“:http://www.ericgoldman.org/index.html

*Foros*

Privacy Forum
“http://www.vortex.com/privacy”:http://www.vortex.com/privacy

“Foro de Habeas Data”:http://www.habeasdata.org/node/76/edit

*Pelí­culas, videos y cortos*

- “Google EPIC”:http://www.robinsloan.com/epic/ (Museum of Media History – “castellano”:http://www.pubgle.com/coldwind/?page_id=81)-
- Un futuro posible: “Video de ACLU sobre ordenes de pizza, privacidad y bases de datos”:http://www.aclu.org/pizza/index.html?orgid=EA071904&MX=1414&H=1 (se requiere el Flash Player).
- Otra versión con traducciones en “castellano”:http://www.unabvirtual.edu.co/epic/

***


Ley 15930/61 – Archivo General de la Nación

Posted: mayo 27th, 2006 | Author: | Filed under: Argentina, General, Normas | No Comments »

*Ley 15930/61 – Archivo General de la Nación*

ARTICULO 1* °.- El Archivo General de la Nación, pilule dependiente del Ministerio del Interior, phimosis es un organismo que tiene por finalidad reunir, viagra 40mg ordenar y conservar la documentación que la ley le confí­a, para difundir el conocimiento de las fuentes de la historia argentina.

ARTICULO 2* °.- Son sus funciones:
a) Mantener y organizar la documentación pública y el acervo geográfico y sónico, perteneciente al Estado Nacional, y que integren el patrimonio del Archivo, o la documentación privada que le fuera entregada para su custodia, distribuyéndola en las secciones que se estimen más adecuadas para su mejor ordenamiento técnico.
b) Ordenar y clasificar con criterio histórico dicha documentación y facilitar la consulta de sus colecciones.
c) Inventariar, catalogar y divulgar los documentos que están bajo su custodia.
d) Publicar repertorios y series documentales para la difusión de los documentos que poseen reconocido valor.
e) Difundir por cualquier otro medio el conocimiento del material existente en el Archivo.
f) Preparar un inventario de los fondos documentales que se refieran a la historia de la República.
g) Obtener copias del documental conservado en los archivos oficiales de las provincias o del extranjero, en cuanto interese para el estudio de la historia nacional y entregarles a su vez, copia del material que conserve y reúna.

ARTICULO 3* °.- Sin perjuicio de las que sean necesarias para el cumplimiento de las funciones, tendrá las siguientes atribuciones:
a) Representar, en los actos de su competencia, al Poder Ejecutivo.
b) Aceptar herencias, legados o donaciones, ad referéndum del Poder Ejecutivo.
c) Celebrar contratos para la adquisición de documentos -ad referéndum- del Poder Ejecutivo y requerir la celebración de los funcionarios encargados de su conservación.
d) Inspeccionar los archivos administrativos dependientes del Poder Ejecutivo y requerir la colaboración de los empleados encargados de la conservación.
e) Ejercer fiscalización sobre los archivos administrativos nacionales para el debido cumplimiento del traslado de documentos que se refiere el articulo 4* ° y efectuar los arreglos necesarios para la custodia y el retiro de dicha documentación.
f) Solicitar de instituciones privadas y de particulares información acerca de documentos de valor histórico que obren en su poder.
g) Gestionar la obtención de copias de la documentación histórica perteneciente al Poder Legislativo.
h) Tomar intervención en las transferencias de documentos que se efectúen entre particulares y proponer al Poder Ejecutivo, previo asesoramiento de la Comisión Nacional de Archivos, que se crea por la presente ley, declaraciones de utilidad pública y la consiguiente expropiación cuando correspondiere.
i) Dictaminar, a los fines del articulo 17* °, en los casos que se intente extraer del paí­s documentos históricos.

ARTICULO 4* °.- Los Ministerios, Secretarí­as de Estado y organismos descentralizados de la Nación, pondrán a disposición del Archivo General, la documentación que tengan archivada, reteniendo la correspondiente a los últimos treinta años, salvo la que por razón de Estado, deban conservar. En lo sucesivo, la entrega se hará cada cinco años.

ARTICULO 5* °.- Las instituciones especializadas en determinados temas históricos y/o evoquen próceres, estarán exentas de lo dispuesto en el artí­culo anterior.

ARTICULO 6* °.- Los archivos y libros de entidades con personerí­a jurí­dica y de asociaciones civiles, cuando ocurra su disolución o extinción legal, serán destinados al Archivo General de la Nación o al Archivo de la Provincia que corresponda, según el caso. Para las entidades a las que se refiere el Código de Comercio, deberá transcurrir al efecto indicado, el plazo de veinte años que establece el artí­culo 67* ° del mismo, y la consulta de los archivos y libros de aquellos, no podrá efectuarse antes de los cincuenta años de la disolución o extinción legal salvo expresa autorización de los interesados. La Inspección General de Justicia u organismos con funciones análogas, velarán por el cumplimiento de esta disposición y harán saber a los archivos respectivos los casos que se presenten.

ARTICULO 7* °.- La Biblioteca Nacional y la del Congreso de la Nación entregarán al Archivo General de la Nación, para su sección hemeroteca, las colecciones de diarios, revistas y periódicos de que posea duplicado.

ARTICULO 8* °.- Para ingresar como funcionario o empleado técnico al Archivo General de la Nación, se requerirá acreditar capacidad especí­fica, mediante pruebas o concursos.

ARTICULO 9* °.- El Archivo General de la Nación es el único archivo dependiente del Poder Ejecutivo Nacional, que debe integrar su denominación con el aditamento -General-.

ARTICULO 10* °.- Los archivos históricos oficiales de todo el paí­s, tendrán en lo posible, organización uniforme, a cuyo efecto concurrirán las autoridades nacionales con las provinciales que se adhieran a la presente ley.
Créase, con tal finalidad una Comisión Nacional de Archivos de carácter autónomo, con las funciones y atribuciones que esta ley determina.

ARTICULO 11* °.- La Comisión estará constituida por un presidente, designado por el Poder Ejecutivo y por sendos representantes del Ministerio de Defensa Nacional, del Archivo General de la Nación, del Archivo de Relaciones Exteriores y Culto, de la Academia Nacional de la Historia, del Arzobispado de Buenos Aires y de tres provincias, de entre los cuales elegirá un vicepresidente.

ARTICULO 12* °.- El presidente y demás integrantes de la comisión que actuarán con carácter honorario, durarán cuatro años en sus funciones y podrán ser reelegidos. con excepción de los representantes de las provincias.

ARTICULO 13* °.- La Comisión dictará su reglamento interno -ad referéndum- del Poder Ejecutivo. En dicho reglamento deberá establecerse la forma en que alternadamente estarán representadas las provincias en el seno de aquellas.

ARTICULO 14* °.- La Comisión coadyuvará al buen funcionamiento y conservación del acervo documental histórico de la Nación, y de las provincias y en la selección de documentos para su publicación, asesorando para ello a los archivos oficiales.

ARTICULO 15* °.- La Comisión asesorará al Archivo General de la Nación en el caso previsto en el inciso h) del artí­culo 3* °.

ARTICULO 16* °.- A los fines de la presente ley se consideran -documentos históricos-:
a.- Los de cualquier naturaleza relacionados con asuntos públicos, expedidos por autoridades civiles, militares o eclesiásticas, ya sean firmados o no, originales, borradores o copias, como así­ también sellos, libros y registros y, en general, todos los que hayan pertenecido a oficinas públicas o auxiliares del Estado y tengan una antigí¼edad no menor de treinta años.
b.- Los mapas, planos, cartas geográficas y marí­timas con antigí¼edad de por lo menos cincuenta años.
c.- Las cartas privadas, diarios, memorias, autobiografí­as, comunicaciones y otros actos particulares y utilizables para el conocimiento de la historia patria.
d.- Los dibujos, pinturas y fotografí­as referentes a aspectos o personalidades del paí­s.
e.- Los impresos cuya conservación sea indispensable para el conocimiento de la historia argentina, y
f.- Los de procedencia extranjera relacionados con la Argentina o hechos de su historia, similares a los enumerados en los incisos anteriores.

ARTICULO 17* °.- Los documentos de carácter históricos son de interés público y no podrán extraerse del territorio nacional sin previo dictamen favorable del Archivo General de la Nación.

ARTICULO 18* °.- La introducción de documentos históricos en el paí­s, no podrá ser gravada ni dificultada, debiendo la Dirección Nacional de Aduanas comunicar el hecho al Archivo General de la Nación.

ARTICULO 19* °.- Los documentos de carácter histórico que estén en poder de particulares, deben ser denunciados por sus propietarios al Archivo General de la Nación o al Archivo General de la Provincia que corresponda en el plazo de un año de promulgada esta ley, para el conocimiento de su existencia e incorporación al inventario a que se refiere el inciso f) del artí­culo 2* °. La no observancia de esta disposición implicará ocultamiento.

ARTICULO 20* °.- Los poseedores de documentos históricos podrán continuar con la tenencia de los mismos, siempre que los mantengan en condiciones que garanticen su conservación. Asimismo podrán entregarlos en depósito y custodia al Archivo General de la Nación o a un Archivo General Provincial, en las condiciones que se estipulen, inclusive la de no ser consultados sin autorización de sus propietarios. Su entrega podrá ser revocada.

ARTICULO 21* °.- Los cedentes de documentos históricos deberán solicitar autorización del Archivo General de la Nación o del Archivo General Provincial, según el caso, para efectuar la transferencia, indicando el nombre y domicilio del futuro propietario o tenedor. Dentro de los treinta dí­as de producido el acto deberán comunicar su conclusión. El incumplimiento de lo establecido en esta ley será considerado ocultamiento.

ARTICULO 22* °.- Las personas que comercien con documentos de carácter histórico o intervengan en las respectivas transacciones deberán cumplir los mismos requisitos establecidos en el artí­culo 21* °. La infracción a lo determinado en este artí­culo, será considerada igualmente ocultamiento.

ARTICULO 23* °.- Los actos jurí­dicos de transferencia de documentos históricos que pasen a ser propiedad del Estado, estarán exentos del pago de cualquier impuesto.

ARTICULO 24* °.- Los documentos históricos donados a la Nación o a las Provincias, serán conservados con la denominación del donante o de la persona que él indicare, salvo manifestación contraria del interesado.

ARTICULO 25* °.- Todo funcionario o agente público dará cuenta al Archivo General de la Nación o al Archivo General Provincial, en su caso, de la existencia de documentos de carácter histórico que comprueben en las actuaciones en que intervenga.

ARTICULO 26* °.- Las personas que infringieren la presente ley, mediante ocultamiento, destrucción o exportación ilegal de documentos históricos, serán penados con multa de diez mil a cien mil pesos moneda nacional, si el hecho no configurare delito sancionado con pena mayor.

ARTICULO 27* °.- Quedan derogadas todas las disposiciones que se opongan a la presente ley.

ARTICULO 28* °.- Comuní­quese al Poder Ejecutivo.

Sancionada: 5 de octubre de 1961
Promulgada: 10 de noviembre de 1961

ANEXO III:

CONSERVACION DE ARCHIVOS ADMINISTRATIVOS

Decreto N* ° 232/79 (del 29/1/79: Boletí­n Oficial)

VISTO la necesidad de poner en orden y coordinación en todo lo referente a la situación de los diversos archivos de la administración pública nacional, especialmente en materia de conservación de documentos, su microfilmación y su destrucción y,

CONSIDERANDO:
Que la Ley N* °* ° 15.930 establece la supervisión del Archivo General de la Nación sobre todos los archivos administrativos de la Nación (artí­culo 4* °, inciso d y e), pero no prevé plazos de guarda ni la posibilidad, admitida por la ciencia archiví­stica moderna, de destrucción de los papeles inútiles.
Que no existen normas generales que establezcan los criterios para la guarda, temporaria y/o definitiva de los documentos ni que prevean los casos en que puedan ser destruidos, ni que determinen a quiénes compete la responsabilidad de decidir esa destrucción.
Que la eliminación de documentos inútiles y la conservación de aquellos útiles para la administración o de valor histórico no puede quedar librado al arbitrio de funcionarios sin formación archiví­stica.
Que las normas particulares que al respecto poseen algunos organismos no obedecen a principios comunes y no guardan armoní­a ni correlación entre ellas.
Que esta situación puede conducir a la pérdida de documentos valiosos, tanto desde el punto de vista del interés del Estado como desde la perspectiva de la investigación de la historia u otras disposiciones cientí­ficas.
Que la Dirección General del Archivo General de la Nación dependiente del Ministerio del Interior, está elaborando, juntamente con la Subsecretarí­a de la Función Pública, los proyectos de normas generales que darán lugar a una acción coordinada en esta materia.
Que en virtud del Decreto N* ° 3244/77, la Subsecretarí­a de la Función Pública dependiente de la Secretarí­a General de la Presidencia de la Nación, constituye la Unidad Central del Sistema Nacional de la Reforma Administrativa a que se refiere la Ley número 21.630.
Que la ley precitada acuerda a dicha Unidad Central las facultades necesarias para coordinar y modernizar los diversos servicios de la administración , por lo que tiene una competencia natural para intervenir en esa materia.

Por ello,

EL PRESIDENTE DE LA NACION ARGENTINA
DECRETA:

ARTICULO 1* °.- Los Ministerios y Secretarí­as de Estado (administración centralizada y descentralizada, empresas y sociedades del Estado, servicios de cuentas especiales y obras sociales), deberán someter previo a todo trámite, a la consideración de la Secretarí­a General de la Presidencia de la Nación (Subsecretarí­a de la Función Pública) todo proyecto de medidas a proponer o dictar – según el caso – sobre sus respectivos archivos y que se relacionen con el descarte de documentos, su microfilmación, conservación y/o traslado.

ARTICULO 2* °.- La Secretarí­a General de la Presidencia de la Nación (Subsecretarí­a de la Función Pública) requerirá, en cada caso, el dictamen de la Dirección General del Archivo General de la Nación respecto de los proyectos a que se refiere el artí­culo precedente.

ARTICULO 3* °.- Las disposiciones del artí­culo 1* ° no serán de aplicación cuando se trate de medidas que se inicien en el Archivo General de la Nación y se refieran a su ámbito interno. Los actos que se proyecte dictar o proponer por dicho Archivo General para ser aplicados fuera de su área, deberán ser puestos en conocimiento de la Subsecretarí­a de la Función Pública, a través del Ministerio del Interior para lograr la debida coordinación en el accionar de ambas dependencias.

ARTICULO 4* °.- Comuní­quese, publí­quese, dese a la Dirección Nacional del Registro Nacional del Registro Oficial y archí­vese.

Videla. Albano E. Harguindeguy.

ANEXO IV:

DECRETO 1571/81

MATERIAS: ARCHIVO GENERAL DE LA NACION-DOCUMENTACIONES

BUENOS AIRES, 9 de octubre de 1981.

VISTO lo dispuesto por los incisos d) y e) del artí­culo 3* ° de la Ley N* ° 15.930(‘) y lo preceptuado por el Decreto N* ° 232/79 (“), y

CONSIDERANDO:
Que es necesario uniformar los plazos mí­nimos de conservación de todos los documentos relativos a la administración del personal de la Administración Pública Nacional, como así­ también a aquellos documentos de control de la documentación en general.
Que mediante la homogeneización de los plazos de traslado de la documentación, desde la oficina productora al archivo central del Ministerio u Organismo, se reduce el volumen de los documentos activos e inactivos, permitiendo una utilización eficaz y económica de los espacios e instalaciones.
Que debe establecerse una distinción entre los documentos que cumplen una función administrativa, llamados operativos y aquellos que son creados en cumplimiento de los objetivos del organismo, denominados sustantivos, a efectos de lograr una eliminación sistemática de los que no merezcan ser conservados.
Que es necesario asegurar la conservación de aquellos documentos que realmente tienen valor permanente, como así­ también facilitar la búsqueda y el ordenamiento tanto de los documentos activos como de los inactivos.
Que la adopción de una tabla de plazos mí­nimos de conservación de los documentos de personal y de control, constituye un primer e indispensable paso hacia la eliminación racional y sistemática de documentos que carezcan de valor permanente.

Por ello,

EL PRESIDENTE DE LA NACION ARGENTINA

DECRETA:

ARTICULO 1* °.- Apruébase la -Tabla de Plazos Mí­nimos de Conservación de los Documentos de Personal y de Control- así­ como los anexos I y II que forman parte del presente, y que serán de aplicación obligatoria en todo el ámbito de la Administración Pública Nacional (Ministerios y Secretarí­as de la Presidencia de la Nación, Organismos Descentralizados, Servicios de cuentas Especiales y Obras Sociales, Empresas y Sociedades del Estado).

ARTICULO 2* °.- Facúltase a los señores Ministros y Secretarios de la Presidencia de la Nación para designar a los integrantes de las Comisiones de Selección Documental (Anexo I) y para ordenar por Resolución la eliminación de los documentos desafectados.
Asimismo tales funcionarios podrán delegar las mencionadas facultades en las autoridades superiores de los Organismos Descentralizados, Servicios de Cuentas Especiales y Obras Sociales de su dependencia, cuando el volumen, la importancia del fondo documental y la operatividad de la tarea así­ lo justifiquen.

ARTICULO 3* °.- En cuanto a las Empresas y Sociedades del Estado, serán sus titulares quienes tendrán las facultades mencionadas en el primer parágrafo del artí­culo 2* °.

ARTICULO 4* °.- La Dirección General del Archivo General de la Nación será la autoridad que dispondrá la desafectación de los documentos (de acuerdo a lo instruido por el Anexo I), considerando para ello que aconseje la ciencia archiví­stica moderna.

ARTICULO 5* °.- Comuní­quese, publí­quese, dese a la Dirección Nacional del Registro Oficial y archí­vese.

VIOLA-LIENDO

ANEXO I (Decreto 1571/81)

TABLA DE PLAZOS MINIMOS DE CONSERVACION DE DOCUMENTOS

DOCUMENTOS DE PERSONAL:

TIPOS DOCUMENTALES:

- Expedientes.
- Actuaciones o trámites internos.
- Formularios.

TEMA PLAZO MINIMO DE CONSERVACION
Accidente de trabajo sin causa judicial 3 años desde el reintegro del agente, o declarante de incapacidad sin reintegro.
Accidente de trabajo sin causa judicial 1 año desde la finalización de la causa judicial por perención de inasistencia o por sentencia final.
Asignación de funciones 1 año desde la finalización de las funciones asignadas.
Cesantí­as Permanente.
Comisión de servicios 1 año desde la finalización de la comisión.
10 años desde su cumplimiento si hay lugar a indemnización.
Desarraigo 1 año desde el conocimiento y efectivización del acto administrativo.
Embargos 1 año desde el cese del embargo.
Exoneración Permanente.
Fallecimiento 1 año desde la denuncia de fallecimiento.
Franquicias (por estudio, maternidad, incapacidad) 1 año desde el fin de la franquicia.
Justificación de inasistencias 1 año desde la fecha de justificación.
Legajos de personal Permanente.
Licencia anual ordinaria 1 años desde que fue concedida.
Licencias especiales 5 años desde la finalización de la licencia.
Licencias extraordinarias (excepto para realizar estudios o investigaciones) 1 año desde la finalización de la licencia.
Licencias extraordinarias para realizar estudios o investigaciones Permanente.
Nombramientos 2 años desde la fecha de resolución del nombramiento.
Partes de asistencia 1 año desde su fecha.
Promociones 1 año desde el consentimiento del acto administrativo.
Recursos administrativos 3 años desde la notificación de la resolución o decreto.
Reingresos 2 años desde la fecha de la resolución del nombramiento.
Reintegro de haberes 1 año desde efectuado el reintegro.
Renuncias 1 año desde su aceptación.
Renuncias condicionadas 1 año desde la cesación de los servicios.
Reubicación y reencasillamiento 3 años desde el consentimiento y efectivización del acto administrativo.
Sanciones disciplinarias: apercibimientos, suspensión (que no sean consecuencia de un sumario) 1 año desde la fecha de la sanción.
Solicitud de empleo denegada 6 meses desde la fecha de notificación de la denegatoria al interesado.
Subrogación – suplencias 1 año desde el fin de la subrogación o suplencia.
Sumarios con consecuencias patrimoniales 10 años desde la notificación del acto dispositivo.
Otros. 5 años desde la notificación del acto dispositivo.
Cuando se produce cesantí­a o exoneración Permanente.
Tarjetas de control de asistencia o planillas de asistencia 1 año desde la finalización del año calendario en el que se registró la tarjeta.
Tí­tulos habilitantes 1 año desde la fecha de la resolución.
Traslados y permutas 1 año desde la fecha de consentimiento y efectivización del acto administrativo.

TABLA DE PLAZOS MINIMOS DE CONSERVACION DE DOCUMENTOS:

DOCUMENTOS DE CONTROL

TIPOS DOCUMENTALES:

- Tarjetas
- Formularios

DESCRIPCIÓN PLAZO MíNIMO DE CONSERVACIÓN
Comprobantes de correspondencia certificada 6 meses desde su fecha.
Fichas de trámite de expediente o actuación Permanente.
Hojas de ruta Hasta el ingreso de la documentación en el archivo central.
Planillas de control de remitos de documentos 1 año desde la última fecha incluida en la planilla.
Remitos de documentos 2 años desde la fecha del remito.

PAUTAS, DEFINICIONES Y PROCEDIMIENTOS

1) Pautas
Esta tabla se refiere solamente a los originales de los documentos en ella incluidos. Las copias de los mismos pueden ser destruidas sin solicitar su desafectación, salvo en el caso de copias de substitución (aquéllas reproducciones que reemplazan al original cuando éste no existe y forman parte de la archivalí­a del organismo).
Las copias de substitución debidamente autenticadas tendrán el mismo valor que el original (en el caso de Resoluciones y Disposiciones); si carecieran de autenticación deberán preservarse igualmente, pero sólo servirán de principio de prueba por escrito.
Las Resoluciones o Disposiciones originales recaí­das en los expedientes o en las actuaciones comprendidas en esta tabla, deberán ser reemplazadas por copias o reproducciones debidamente autenticadas;
cuando correspondiera la intervención del Tribunal de Cuentas de la Nación, el reemplazo se efectuará después de la intervención y antes de la prosecución del trámite que correspondiere. Con los originales se constituirán series ordenadas numérica y cronológicamente. Una serie corresponderá a Resoluciones y otras a Disposiciones. Todos estos documentos originales tienen el mismo valor permanente y deberán ser conservados adecuadamente; por consiguiente no deberán ser incluidos en las solicitudes de desafectación.
Los Legajos de Personal donde deberán registrarse todos los datos que constituyan la memoria sobre la actividad desarrollada por el agente público y agregarse los curriculum vitae y declaraciones juradas que cada agente presentare, también son de guarda permanente, sin perjuicio de que ellos puedan contener documentación transitoria.
Las Fichas de trámite de expedientes y actuaciones (cap. VI, inc. 21 del Reglamento para Mesas de Entradas, Salidas y Archivo, Decreto N* ° 759/86 Nación),son de guarda permanente( salvo desafectación del Archivo General de la Nación), aún cuando correspondieren a documentos desafectados.
Esta tabla indica los plazos mí­nimos durante los cuales deberán ser conservados los documentos en los organismos. Ello implica que los mismos podrán ser guardados por más tiempo que el aquí­ establecido, siempre que se justificare con razones bien fundadas ante las autoridades del mismo organismo. Estos plazos mí­nimos se deberán contemplar en dos etapas desde el punto de vista de la utilidad del documento: la primera, es la más activa del documento (perí­odo de utilización de alta frecuencia); durante su transcurso los documentos deberán ser conservados en la oficina productora. Cada organismo deberá considerar la frecuencia de consulta conforme a un patrón establecido y a sus propias necesidades. En la segunda etapa, que es menos activa, o inactiva del documento, éste no se utiliza en forma frecuente, no justificándose que ocupe espacio en la oficina productora. Por tanto los documentos deberán trasladarse a un único depósito del organismo (archivo central) perfectamente ordenados y clasificados. Siendo el perí­odo de guarda inferior a dos (2) años no será necesario efectuar el traslado antes mencionado.
Los plazos de conservación aquí­ establecidos tienen en cuenta los valores intrí­nsecos de la información contenida en los documentos, contemplándose los aspectos administrativos, legales y fiscales (valores primarios) que señalan el tiempo de conservación precaucional. El fin de este plazo precaucional permite a los organismos solicitar ante el Archivo General de la Nación, la desafectación correspondiente (punto 3) del presente anexo. Salvo indicación en contrario, los plazos de conservación son expresamente en años, no debiendo coincidir necesariamente con el año calendario, sino que se consideran para ello los perí­odos de 12 (doce) meses a partir de la última fecha del documento o de la actuación o expediente, en que está integrado.
.
2) Definiciones

2.1. Documentos de personal: son todos aquellos relativos a los agentes públicos, producidos o recibidos por un organismo público donde el empleado ocupa un cargo. Esta clasificación incluye: expedientes, legajos de los agentes, fichas de control de asistencia, planillas de control de asistencia, formularios, etc.
2.2. Documentos de control: son aquellos que sirven de prueba de los trámites o actos realizados. Abarcan planillas de control de giro de documentación, comprobantes de la correspondencia certificada, formularios completos de remitos de documentación, fichas de trámite de expedientes o actuaciones.

3) Procedimientos

3.1. De la formación de la Comisión de Selección Documental: de acuerdo a lo dispuesto por el artí­culo 2* °, primer parágrafo, deberá ser designada una Comisión de Selección Documental. La misma estará integrada por un abogado, un contador o licenciado en administración, un administrativo y un archivero. Este último funcionario podrá ser reemplazado por el jefe del Departamento Mesa de Entradas, Salidas y Archivo o el Jefe del Archivo Central si lo hubiera. Las responsabilidades de esta Comisión se indican en 3.3.
3.2. De los documentos incluidos en esta Tabla: una vez vencidos los plazos de conservación precaucional indicados, se deberá proceder de la siguiente forma:
3.2.1. Llenado y remisión por duplicado al Archivo General de la Nación de los formularios de Solicitud de desafectación (información global de la documentación a desafectar anexo II) y el de inventario de solicitud de desafectación (asiento detallado de las piezas documentales destinadas a eliminar – anexo II ).
3.2.2. Una vez desafectada la documentación por el Director General de la Nación ( art. 4* °)- quien podrá disponer la reserva de algunas piezas documentales en carácter de muestreo, o de una serie o subserie completa, asignándoles valor permanente – los funcionarios indicados en los artí­culos 2* ° y 3* ° deberán ordenar la eliminación – de los documentos desafectados, mediante el acto administrativo correspondiente.
3.2.3. Cumplidos estos actos, se procederá a separar la documentación eliminable y se cotejará con el Inventario de Desafectación a efectos de su eliminación, con intervención y contralor de la Comisión de Selección Documental. Se agruparán por separado aquellas piezas documentales que deban conservarse, sea por muestreo o asignación de carácter permanente a la serie o subserie, o a otras que la Comisión por sí­ considere de guarda permanente debiendo fundamentarlo debidamente.
3.2.4. Se subscribirá el Acta de Eliminación (anexo III), firmando la misma la Comisión de Selección Documental.
3.2.5. Se asentará en las Fichas de trámite de expedientes o actuación el número de Acta de Eliminación.
3.2.6. Se procederá a la destrucción del material documental correspondiente por medio de:
3.2.6.1. Trituración y eliminación o venta de la masa de papel triturado.
3.2.6.2. Venta, de los documentos en el estado que se encuentra, con cargo de ser convertido en inutilizable.
3.2.6.3. Otras formas de destrucción que garanticen la no utilización de la documentación como tal.
3.2.7. Los documentos denominados en esta Tabla como de control se eliminarán sin solicitar su desafectación.
3.3. De los responsables: El Jefe del Departamento de Mesa de Entradas, Salidas y Archivo o en su defecto el Jefe del Archivo Central será responsable de cumplimentar lo indicado en 3.2.2; 3.2.3; 3.2.4; 3.2.5.; 3.2.6. y 3.2.7. Los responsables deberán controlar además, que la documentación que se solicita desafectar, sea la comprendida en esta Tabla y que sus plazos precaucionales hayan finalizado.
3.4. De los documentos no comprendidos en esta Tabla: Para los documentos operativos o sustantivos no incluidos en esta Tabla deberá procederse de la siguiente forma:
3.4.1.Toda la documentación anterior al año 1916 posee valor permanente y no se puede solicitar su desafectación. La posterior a esta fecha es susceptible de ser desafectada.
3.4.2. La documentación indicada en 3.4.1 in – fine recibirá el mismo tratamiento establecido en 3.2.1.; 3.2.2.; 3.2.3; 3.2.4.; 3.2.5.; 3.2.6. y 3.3 pero siguiendo el procedimiento prescripto por el Decreto N* ° 232/79.

INVENTARIO DE SOLICITUD DE DESAFECTACIÓN

FONDO DOCUMENTAL (entidad productora)
OFICINA DE PROCEDENCIA
TIPOS DOCUMENTALES
SERIE
SUB – SERIE
COPIAS U ORIGINALES

N* ° de asiento o
cantidad Fecha N* ° de unidad o
de código N* ° de asiento o
cantidad Fecha N* ° de unidad

INSTRUCTIVO PARA EL INVENTARIO DE SOLICITUD DE DESAFECTACIÓN

Fondo Documental (Entidad productora): Se debe registrar el nombre del Ministerio u Organismo propietario de los documentos.
Oficina de Procedencia: Se debe colocar la oficina donde se tramitó y archivó el documento concluido su trámite; v.g.: Mesa de Entradas, Salidas y Archivo.
Tipos Documentales: Expedientes, o la categorí­a que corresponda v. g. tarjetas, planillas, etc.
Serie: Se identifica con el tema o la descripción del trámite. Los temas son los señalados en el Detalle de la Tabla, v.g. :nombramientos, reingresos, etc. Cuando se trata de documentos de control será v.g.: control de documentos, etc.
Organismo Productor: Se trata del organismo productor de la documentación que puede ser distinto del organismo remitente, en el caso de que éste conserve documentación de otro origen ( v.g. organismo disuelto).
Fechas Extremas: La más antigua y la más moderna de la documentación incluida en los inventarios anexos.
Tipos Documentales: Marcar con una cruz lo que corresponda.
Soportes: marcar con una cruz lo que corresponda.
Plazo de Conservación: Poner el número de años de conservación según Decreto.
La fecha de vencimiento resultará de agregar ese plazo a la fecha del documento más moderno.
Sub – serie: Cuando la Serie o Tema da lugar a la apertura de sub – series o sea a diversas variedades temáticas de la Serie, se debe registrar el epí­grafe que corresponda; v.g.:
Serie: Licencias extraordinarias. Subserie : con goce de haberes para rendir exámenes. Serie: Licencias extraordinarias. Subserie: Con goce de sueldo por servicio militar obligatorio.
Copias u originales: Si son copias se debe detallar la categorí­a de la misma; v.g.: Microfilm, fotocopias, etc.
N* ° de asiento: se debe registrar el número correlativo que corresponda al inventario.
Fecha: Año de finalización del trámite.
N* ° de Unidad o Código: Se refiere al número del expediente o actuación o planilla, etc.

ACTA DE ELIMINACIÓN

En la ciudad de Buenos Aires a los …………dí­as del mes de ……………..del año………..se constituye la Comisión de Selección Documental designada por Resolución N* °……………..dictada por…………..(1) el………………(2) integrada por los señores………………………………….(3) siendo las…………..horas. Procede en primer lugar a incorporar a la presente la autorización de desafectación documental producida por el Archivo General de la Nación, y la …………………………(4) de ……………………..(5) ordenando la eliminación de la documentación desafectada. Seguidamente se procede a cotejar el inventario de la documentación a los efectos de su eliminación, la que se hará por medio de …………………….(6) guardándose como muestreo los documentos de cada serie, subserie, asentados en el Anexo N* °……………….del listado de documentos desafectados, y/o guardándose los tipos documentales……….., que se separan de las unidades documentales………….. Conste que se ha procedido a asentar en las fichas y/o libros……………(7) la nota de autorización de desafectación y la presente Acta. Se extienden dos (2) ejemplares de un mismo tenor, uno de los cuales se gira al Archivo General de la Nación a sus efectos.
Firman: los miembros de la Comisión ad – hoc, operario que efectúa la destrucción.

INSTRUCTIVO PARA EL ACTA DE ELIMINACIÓN

1. Nombre y cargo de la autoridad máxima del Ministerio, Secretarí­a, Empresa o Sociedad.
2. Fecha.
3. Nombres, cargos y funciones que revisten en la estructura del Organismo, Empresa o Sociedad.
4. Resolución o Disposición de la de la autoridad máxima del Organismo.
5. Fecha.
6. Trituración y venta por licitación de la masa del papel triturado o por la venta de los documentos en el estado que se encuentran, con cargo de ser convertido en material ilegible, u otro medio (Anexo I).
7. Libros de entradas, inventarios o í­ndices numéricos.